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The generation and distribution of central bank seigniorage in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland

Author

Listed:
  • Eduard Hochreiter

    () (Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Volkswirtschaftliche Studien, Wien (Austria))

  • Riccardo Rovelli

    () (Università degli Studi di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche, Bologna (Italy))

Abstract

We measure the amount of central bank seigniorage generated in three economies in transition and inquire to what extent seigniorage ultimately accrues to the government. We relate our findings to the institutional environment of the three countries. We find that, in parallel to the process of disinflation, seigniorage has declined substantially in the 1990s in all three countries under consideration pointing to more monetary discipline and a strengthening of central bank independence. Only in Hungary seigniorage benefited the government to a significant amount. We interpret this as being the consequence of past policies, rather than an obstacle to further disinflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Eduard Hochreiter & Riccardo Rovelli, 2002. "The generation and distribution of central bank seigniorage in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 55(223), pages 391-415.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:bnlqrr:2002:43
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    File URL: http://ojs.uniroma1.it/index.php/PSLQuarterlyReview/article/view/9916/9798
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Drazen, Allan, 1985. "A general measure of inflation tax revenues," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 327-330.
    2. Golinelli, Roberto & Rovelli, Riccardo, 2005. "Monetary policy transmission, interest rate rules and inflation targeting in three transition countries," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 183-201, January.
    3. Istvan HameczJanos & VinczeIstvan Zsoldos, "undated". "The Nature(s) of Hungarian Inflation: A Study in Plurality," Ace Project Memoranda 96/3, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    4. Hochreiter, Eduard & Rovelli, Riccardo & Winckler, Georg, 1996. "Central banks and seigniorage: A study of three economies in transition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 629-643, April.
    5. Klein,Martin & Neumann,Manfred, "undated". "Seignorage: What is it and who gets it?," Discussion Paper Serie B 124, University of Bonn, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sandrine Levasseur, 2004. "Why not euroisation?," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 91(5), pages 121-156.
    2. Golinelli, Roberto & Rovelli, Riccardo, 2005. "Monetary policy transmission, interest rate rules and inflation targeting in three transition countries," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 183-201, January.
    3. Eduard Hochreiter & Tadeusz Kowalski, 2000. "Central banks in European emerging market economies in the 1990s," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 53(212), pages 45-70.
    4. Hochreiter, Eduard & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus & Winckler, Georg, 2002. "Monetary union: European lessons, Latin American prospects," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 297-321, December.
    5. Isakova, Asel, 2010. "Currency substitution in the economies of Central Asia : how much does it cost?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 14/2010, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    6. Franziska Schobert, 2003. "Euroisation. Assessing the Loss of Seigniorage and the Impact on the Interest Premium in Central European Countries," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 54(5), pages 913-935.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disinflation; Monetary;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • P24 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - National Income, Product, and Expenditure; Money; Inflation
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P34 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Finance
    • P35 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Public Finance

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