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Trends in Subjective Income Poverty Rates in the European Union

Author

Listed:
  • Tomáš Želinský

    (Czech Academy of Sciences
    Technical University of Košice
    Durham University)

  • Martina Mysíková

    (Czech Academy of Sciences)

  • Thesia I. Garner

    (U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Abstract

When developing anti-poverty policies, policymakers need accurate data on the prevalence of poverty. In this paper, we focus on subjective poverty, a concept which has been largely neglected in the literature, though it remains a conceptually appealing way to define poverty. The primary goal of this study is to re-examine the concept of subjective poverty measurement and to estimate trends in subjective income poverty rates in the European Union. Our estimations are based on a Minimum Income Question using data from a representative survey, EU-SILC. We find robust empirical evidence of decreasing trends in subjective poverty in 16 of 28 EU countries. We conjecture that trends in subjective poverty may reflect changes in societies which are not captured by official poverty indicators, and our results thus enrich the existing data on general poverty trends in the EU.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomáš Želinský & Martina Mysíková & Thesia I. Garner, 2022. "Trends in Subjective Income Poverty Rates in the European Union," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 34(5), pages 2493-2516, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:eurjdr:v:34:y:2022:i:5:d:10.1057_s41287-021-00457-2
    DOI: 10.1057/s41287-021-00457-2
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Subjective poverty; Minimum income question; Intersection approach; EU-SILC; European Union;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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