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Economic Transition And Subjective Poverty In Urban China

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  • John A. Bishop
  • Feijun Luo
  • Xi Pan

Abstract

Market-oriented economic reforms have substantially changed the Chinese economy. A policy of "allowing some to get rich earlier" clearly has benefited some regions of the country more than others. The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes in regional urban poverty during this period of policy transition. Our approach is based on survey responses to minimum needs (i.e., the "subjective method"). For the richest (Coast) and poorest regions (North West) we find unambiguous declines in poverty between 1988 and 1995 for the registered population. For the Central and South West regions we find that changes in poverty over time are sensitive to both the poverty line selected and the poverty index employed. Copyright © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © International Association for Research in Income and Wealth 2006.

Suggested Citation

  • John A. Bishop & Feijun Luo & Xi Pan, 2006. "Economic Transition And Subjective Poverty In Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(4), pages 625-641, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:52:y:2006:i:4:p:625-641
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. GOH, Chor-ching & LUO, Xubei & ZHU, Nong, 2009. "Income growth, inequality and poverty reduction: A case study of eight provinces in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 485-496, September.
    2. John Bishop & Andrew Grodner & Haiyong Liu & Ismael Ahamdanech-Zarco, 2014. "Subjective poverty equivalence scales for Euro Zone countries," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(2), pages 265-278, June.
    3. Ismael Ahamdanech-Zarco & John A. Bishop & Andrew Grodner & Haiyong Liu, 2011. "Subjective poverty equivalence scales for Euro Zone countries," Working Papers 233, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    4. Almås, Ingvild & Johnsen, Åshild Auglænd, 2012. "The cost of living in China: Implications for inequality and poverty," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 21/2012, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    5. Posel, Dorrit & Rogan, Michael, 2014. "Measured as poor versus feeling poor: Comparing objective and subjective poverty rates in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Zhiming Cheng, 2014. "Layoffs and Urban Poverty in the State-Owned Enterprise Communities in Shaanxi Province, China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(1), pages 199-233, March.
    7. Ravallion, Martin & Himelein, Kristen & Beegle, Kathleen, 2013. "Can subjective questions on economic welfare be trusted ? evidence for three developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6726, The World Bank.
    8. Bjorn Gustafsson & Ximing Yue, 2012. "Rural people's perception of income adequacy in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(3), pages 264-280, August.
    9. Luo, Xubei & Zhu, Nong, 2008. "Rising income inequality in China : a race to the top," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4700, The World Bank.
    10. Xiao Luo & Chor-Ching Goh & Nong Zhu, 2014. "Income Growth, Inequality and Poverty Reduction: A Case Study of Eight Provinces in China," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-03, CIRANO.

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