IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eme/caerpp/v4y2012i3p264-280.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Rural people's perception of income adequacy in China

Author

Listed:
  • Bjorn Gustafsson
  • Ximing Yue

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate rural people's perception of income adequacy in order to understand how it is affected by income in the county where the respondent lives, age of household members, as well as number of household members. The paper also aims to find out how poverty lines and poverty counts derived from people's perception relate to what has been previously reported. Design/methodology/approach - The Subjective Poverty Line (SPL) methodology is modified by asking one question on the amount of grains necessary for the respondent's household and another on the amount of cash necessary. Information was obtained from a large survey covering 22 provinces in 2003 and analysed using regressions analysis. Findings - People in high-income counties perceive that more cash, but not grains are needed than those living in low-income counties. Respondents perceive that economies of scale exist in amounts of cash needed for a household. They also perceive that young children need less grain than adults and that a schoolchild incurs higher money expenditures than an adult. A poverty line for rural China derived by the SPL methodology is higher than the low income line used by the National Bureau of Statistics for 2002. However, a poverty count based on the SPL methodology is similar to what has been reported. Practical implications - The findings suggest that poverty lines for rural China preferably should consider not only spatial differences in cost of living but also the number of household members in a non-linear way. Originality/value - The paper describes the first application of the SPL approach to rural China.

Suggested Citation

  • Bjorn Gustafsson & Ximing Yue, 2012. "Rural people's perception of income adequacy in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(3), pages 264-280, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:caerpp:v:4:y:2012:i:3:p:264-280
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/17561371211263310?utm_campaign=RePEc&WT.mc_id=RePEc
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Camelia Minoiu & Sanjay G. Reddy, 2008. "Chinese Poverty: Assessing The Impact Of Alternative Assumptions," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(4), pages 572-596, December.
    2. KNIGHT, John & SONG, Lina & GUNATILAKA, Ramani, 2009. "Subjective well-being and its determinants in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 635-649, December.
    3. Brandt, Loren & Holz, Carsten A, 2006. "Spatial Price Differences in China: Estimates and Implications," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55(1), pages 43-86, October.
    4. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Li, Shi, 2004. "Expenditures on education and health care and poverty in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 292-301.
    5. Diane Colasanto & Arie Kapteyn & Jacques van der Gaag, 1984. "Two Subjective Definitions of Poverty: Results from the Wisconsin Basic Needs Study," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(1), pages 127-138.
    6. Arie Kapteyn & Peter Kooreman & Rob Willemse, 1988. "Some Methodological Issues in the Implementation of Subjective Poverty Definitions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(2), pages 222-242.
    7. Martin Ravallion & Shaohua Chen & Prem Sangraula, 2009. "Dollar a Day Revisited," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 23(2), pages 163-184, June.
    8. Xiuqing Wang & Juan Liu & null null & Shujie Yao & Xian Xin, 2009. "China's rural poverty line and the determinants of rural poverty," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(3), pages 283-300, May.
    9. Garner, Thesia I & de Vos, Klaas, 1995. "Income Sufficiency v. Poverty: Results from the United States and the Netherlands," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 8(2), pages 117-134, May.
    10. John A. Bishop & Feijun Luo & Xi Pan, 2006. "Economic Transition And Subjective Poverty In Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(4), pages 625-641, December.
    11. Thesia I. Garner & Kathleen Short, 2005. "Personal Assessments of Minimum Income and Expenses: What Do They Tell Us about 'Minimum Living' Thresholds and Equivalence Scales?," Working Papers 379, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    12. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2007. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-42, January.
    13. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav & van de Walle, Dominique, 1991. "Quantifying Absolute Poverty in the Developing World," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 37(4), pages 345-361, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Chunni & Xu, Qi & Zhou, Xiang & Zhang, Xiaobo & Xie, Yu, 2014. "Are poverty rates underestimated in China? New evidence from four recent surveys," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 410-425.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:caerpp:v:4:y:2012:i:3:p:264-280. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Virginia Chapman). General contact details of provider: http://www.emeraldinsight.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.