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Overreliance on China and dynamic balancing in the shift of global value chains in response to global pandemic COVID-19: an Australian and New Zealand perspective

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  • Hongzhi Gao

    (Victoria University of Wellington)

  • Monica Ren

    (Macquarie University)

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  • Hongzhi Gao & Monica Ren, 2020. "Overreliance on China and dynamic balancing in the shift of global value chains in response to global pandemic COVID-19: an Australian and New Zealand perspective," Asian Business & Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(3), pages 306-310, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:abaman:v:19:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1057_s41291-020-00121-3
    DOI: 10.1057/s41291-020-00121-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Ahlstrom & Jean‐Luc Arregle & Michael A. Hitt & Gongming Qian & Xufei Ma & Dries Faems, 2020. "Managing Technological, Sociopolitical, and Institutional Change in the New Normal," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 411-437, May.
    2. Gary Gereffi, 2014. "Global value chains in a post-Washington Consensus world," Review of International Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 9-37, February.
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    RePEc Biblio mentions

    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Trade and Globalization

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    Cited by:

    1. Yipeng Liu & Fabian Jintae Froese, 2020. "Crisis management, global challenges, and sustainable development from an Asian perspective," Asian Business & Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(3), pages 271-276, July.
    2. Yipeng Liu & Fabian Jintae Froese, 0. "Crisis management, global challenges, and sustainable development from an Asian perspective," Asian Business & Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 0, pages 1-6.

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