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Wage inequality, minimum wage effects, and spillovers

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  • Mark B. Stewart

Abstract

This paper investigates possible spillover effects of the UK minimum wage. The halt in the growth in inequality in the lower half of the wage distribution (as measured by the 50:10 percentile ratio) since the mid-1990s, in contrast to the continued inequality growth in the upper half of the distribution, suggests the possibility of a minimum wage effect and spillover effects on wages above the minimum. This paper analyses individual wage changes, using both a difference-in-differences estimator and a specification involving comparisons across minimum wage upratings, and concludes that there have not been minimum wage spillovers. Since the UK minimum wage has always been below the 10-super-th percentile, this lack of spillovers implies that minimum wage changes have not had an effect on the 50:10 percentile ratio measure of inequality in the lower half of the wage distribution. Copyright 2012 Oxford University Press 2012 All rights reserved, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark B. Stewart, 2012. "Wage inequality, minimum wage effects, and spillovers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 616-634, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:64:y:2012:i:4:p:616-634
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gps003
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    Cited by:

    1. Denis Fougere & Erwan Gautier & Sébastien Roux, 2016. "The Impact of the National Minimum Wage on Industry-Level Wage Bargaining in France," Sciences Po publications 587, Sciences Po.
    2. Reeves, Aaron & McKee, Martin & Mackenbach, Johan & Whitehead, Margaret & Stuckler, David, 2017. "Introduction of a national minimum wage reduceddepressive symptoms in low-wage workers:a quasi-natural experiment in the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66485, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Marco Caliendo & Alexandra Fedorets & Malte Preuss & Carsten Schröder & Linda Wittbrodt, 2017. "The Short-Term Distributional Effects of the German Minimum Wage Reform," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 948, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. BARGAIN Olivier & DOORLEY Karina & VAN KERM Philippe, 2016. "Minimum wages and the gender gap in pay. Evidence from the UK and Ireland," LISER Working Paper Series 2016-02, LISER.
    5. Wenkai Sun & Xianghong Wang & Xiaoxi Zhang, 2015. "Minimum wage effects on employment and working time of Chinese workers——evidence based on CHNS," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-22, December.
    6. repec:bla:econom:v:84:y:2017:i:334:p:157-179 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Chris Belfield & Richard Blundell & Jonathan Cribb & Andrew Hood & Robert Joyce, 2017. "Two Decades of Income Inequality in Britain: The Role of Wages, Household Earnings and Redistribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 84(334), pages 157-179, April.
    8. Simona Ferraro & Jaanika Merikull & Karsten Staehr, 2016. "Minimum wages and the wage distribution in Estonia," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2016-6, Bank of Estonia, revised 19 Aug 2016.
    9. Salverda, Wiemer & Checchi, Daniele, 2014. "Labour-Market Institutions and the Dispersion of Wage Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 8220, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Joanna K. Swaffield, 2014. "Minimum Wage Hikes And The Wage Growth Of Low-Wage Workers," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(4), pages 384-405, October.
    11. Maria Denisa VASILESCU & Larisa STANILA & Amalia CRISTESCU, 2014. "The evolution of earnings inequality in Romania," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 39(2(48)), pages 88-99, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies

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