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Asymmetric Adjustments of Price and Output

  • Tinsley, P A
  • Krieger, Reva

Classical theories predict rapid price adjustments, which are observed in inflationary episodes; Keynesian theories of sticky prices predict sluggish price responses, which are observed in contractions. The authors attempt to reconcile these observations in a model with asymmetries in producer price and output adjustments. Analysis of SIC two-digit industry data indicates production frequently exhibits negative asymmetry--shortfalls from trend are larger than positive deviations--whereas price often displays positive asymmetry. Evidence supporting two rational motives for asymmetric pricing is presented, but causal interactions between output and price asymmetries are not resolved. Copyright 1997 by Oxford University Press.

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Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 35 (1997)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 631-52

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:35:y:1997:i:3:p:631-52
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  1. Julio Rotemberg, 1987. "The New Keynesian Microfoundations," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1987, Volume 2, pages 69-116 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  12. Falk, Barry L., 1986. "Further Evidence on the Asymmetric Behavior of Economic Time Series over the Business Cycle," Staff General Research Papers 11097, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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  16. repec:oup:restud:v:60:y:1993:i:4:p:889-902 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Canova, Fabio, 1993. "Detrending and Business Cycle Facts," CEPR Discussion Papers 782, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  18. Rotemberg, Julio J & Saloner, Garth, 1986. "A Supergame-Theoretic Model of Price Wars during Booms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 390-407, June.
  19. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1982. "Sticky Prices in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1187-1211, December.
  20. Blinder, Alan S, 1991. "Why Are Prices Sticky? Preliminary Results from an Interview Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 89-96, May.
  21. J. Joseph Beaulieu & Jeffrey A. Miron, 1990. "The Seasonal Cycle in U.S. Manufacturing," Papers 0012, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
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  23. Gonzalo, J. & Granger, C., 1992. "Estimation of Common Long-Memory Components in Cointegrated Systems," Papers 4, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  24. Thomas J. Sargent, 1981. "The ends of four big inflations," Working Papers 158, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  25. Tinsley, P. A., 1970. "Capital Structure, Precautionary Balances, and Valuation of the Firm: The Problem of Financial Risk," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(01), pages 33-62, March.
  26. Sims, Christopher A., 1992. "Interpreting the macroeconomic time series facts : The effects of monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 975-1000, June.
  27. McQueen, Grant & Thorley, Steven, 1993. "Asymmetric business cycle turning points," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 341-362, June.
  28. Robert B. Barsky & Gary Solon, 1989. "Real Wages Over The Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 2888, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  29. Taylor, John B, 1980. "Aggregate Dynamics and Staggered Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 1-23, February.
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  31. Andrew Caplin & John Leahy, 1991. "State-Dependent Pricing and the Dynamics of Money and Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(3), pages 683-708.
  32. P.A. Tinsley, 1971. "On ramps, turnpikes, and distributed lag approximations of optimal intertemporal adjustment," Special Studies Papers 15, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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