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The Generalized Composite Commodity Theorem and Food Demand Estimation

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  • Albert J. Reed
  • J. William Levedahl
  • Charles Hallahan

Abstract

This article reports tests of aggregation over consumer food products and estimates of aggregate food demand elasticities. Evidence that food demand variables follow unit root processes leads us to build on and simplify existing tests of the Generalized Composite Commodity Theorem. We compute food demand elasticities using a method of cointegration that is shown to apply to a convenient but nonlinear functional form. Estimates are based on consumer reported expenditure data rather than commercial disappearance data. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Albert J. Reed & J. William Levedahl & Charles Hallahan, 2005. "The Generalized Composite Commodity Theorem and Food Demand Estimation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(1), pages 28-37.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:87:y:2005:i:1:p:28-37
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.0002-9092.2005.00699.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Schroeter, Christiane & Lusk, Jayson & Tyner, Wallace, 2008. "Determining the impact of food price and income changes on body weight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 45-68, January.
    2. Smith Trenton G. & Stoddard Christiana & Barnes Michael G, 2009. "Why the Poor Get Fat: Weight Gain and Economic Insecurity," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-31, June.
    3. Kumcu, Aylin & Okrent, Abigail M ., 2014. "Methodology for the Quarterly Food- Away-from - Home Prices Data," Technical Bulletins 184292, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Zhen Miao & John C. Beghin & Helen H. Jensen, 2013. "Accounting For Product Substitution In The Analysis Of Food Taxes Targeting Obesity," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(11), pages 1318-1343, November.
    5. Leffler, Kristyn K. & Carpio, Carlos E. & Boonsaeng, Tullaya, 2012. "Temporal Aggregation and Treatment of Zero Dependent Variables in the Estimation of Food Demand using Cross-Sectional Data," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124913, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Schroeter, Christiane & Lusk, Jayson L. & Tyner, Wallace E., 2005. "Determining the Impact of Food Price and Income Changes on Obesity," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19234, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Lee L. Schulz & Ted C. Schroeder & Tian Xia, 2012. "Studying composite demand using scanner data: the case of ground beef in the US," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43, pages 49-57, November.
    8. Catherine Durham & James Eales, 2010. "Demand elasticities for fresh fruit at the retail level," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(11), pages 1345-1354.
    9. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2011. "Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," Monographs, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation, number 251908.
    10. Buttet, Sebastien & Dolar, Veronika, 4. "The Price Of One Sweet Calorie," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 3(4).
    11. Heng, Yan & House, Lisa, 2016. "A Composite Demand Analysis for the Beverage Market," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235704, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2012. "The Demand for Disaggregated Food-Away-from-Home and Food-at-Home Products in the United States," Economic Research Report 132469, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    13. Asche, Frank & Guttormsen, Atle G. & Kristofersson, Dadi & Roheim, Cathy A., 2005. "Import Demand Estimation and the Generalized Composite Commodity Theorem," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19432, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    14. Buttet, Sebastien & Dolar, Veronika, 2015. "Toward a quantitative theory of food consumption choices and body weight," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 143-156.

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