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The impact of migrant workers' remittances on the living standards of families in Morocco: A propensity score matching approach

Listed author(s):
  • Jamal Bouyiour

    ()

    (Department of Economics, PAU University, France)

  • Amal Miftah

    (Dial Paris Dauphine, France)

This article attempts to assess empirically the impact of remittances on household expenditure and relative poverty in Morocco. We apply propensity score matching methods to the 2006/2007 Moroccan Living Standards Measurement Survey. We find that migrants’ remittances can improve living standards among Moroccan households and affect negatively the incidence of poverty. The results show a statistically significant and positive impact of hose remittances on recipient households’ expenditures. They are also significantly associated with a decline in the probability of being in poverty for rural households; it decreases by 11.3 percentage points. In comparison, this probability decreases by 3 points in urban area.

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Article provided by Transnational Press London, UK in its journal Migration Letters.

Volume (Year): 12 (2015)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 13-27

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Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:12:y:2015:i:1:p:13-27
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Jean-Louis Combes & Christian Hubert Ebeke & Mathilde Maurel & Thierry Yogo, 2011. "Remittances and the Prevalence of Working Poor," Working Papers halshs-00585004, HAL.
  2. Adams, Richard H., Jr., 1991. "The effects of international remittances on poverty, inequality, and development in rural Egypt:," Research reports 86, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2010. "Do International Remittances Affect Poverty in Africa?," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 22(1), pages 51-91.
  4. Richard P.C. Brown & Eliana Jimenez, 2008. "Estimating the net effects of migration and remittances on poverty and inequality: comparison of Fiji and Tonga," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 547-571.
  5. Acosta, Pablo & Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lopez, J. Humberto, 2007. "The impact of remittances on poverty and human capital : evidence from Latin American household surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4247, The World Bank.
  6. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4711 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Coudouel, Aline & Hentschel, Jesko & Wodon, Quentin, 2002. "Mesure et analyse de la pauvreté
    [Poverty Measurement and Analysis]
    ," MPRA Paper 10490, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
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