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Migration and US economic competitiveness

Author

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  • Philip L. Martin

    (Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, University of California-Davis, 1 Shields Ave, 2101 SSH, Davis, CA 95616, USA)

Abstract

Most Americans are dissatisfied with US immigration policies. This dissatisfaction stems from several factors, including the presence of over 11 million unauthorized foreigners and the fact that many US immigrants who want their spouses and children to join them face long waits. There is also a sense that the US, which accepts over a million immigrants and several hundred thousand temporary foreign workers a year, is not getting enough highly skilled immigrants and temporary workers who could bolster innovation and competitiveness in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. It is very hard to measure the benefits and costs of immigrants and migrant workers, which is one reason why the unsatisfactory status quo persists.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip L. Martin, 2013. "Migration and US economic competitiveness," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 10(2), pages 125-143, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:10:y:2013:i:2:p:125-143
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    2. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    3. David Card, 1990. "The Impact of the Mariel Boatlift on the Miami Labor Market," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 43(2), pages 245-257, January.
    4. Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2005. "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the U.S," NBER Working Papers 11672, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Rachel M. Friedberg & Jennifer Hunt, 1995. "The Impact of Immigrants on Host Country Wages, Employment and Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 23-44, Spring.
    6. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tiia Vissak & Xiaotian Zhang, 2014. "Chinese immigrant entrepreneurs’ involvement in internationalization and innovation: Three Canadian cases," Journal of International Entrepreneurship, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 183-201, June.

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