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Labor Market Effects of School Ties: Evidence from Graduates of Leveled High Schools in South Korea

Author

Listed:
  • Seungjoo Lee

    (Chung-Ang University)

  • Changhui Kang

    (Chung-Ang University)

Abstract

Before 1974, general high schools in Korea were stratified by a selective admission system. Starting from 1974, it was replaced by a leveling system in which students were randomly assigned to a school within a district. This paper examines whether the quality of school ties formed by senior graduates of the selective system affects contemporary outcomes of junior graduates randomly assigned to the same school under the leveling system. The quality of school ties does not strongly affect the average junior graduate��s outcomes. In contrast, it benefits junior graduates who rank high in the outcome distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Seungjoo Lee & Changhui Kang, 2015. "Labor Market Effects of School Ties: Evidence from Graduates of Leveled High Schools in South Korea," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 31, pages 199-237.
  • Handle: RePEc:kea:keappr:ker-20150630-31-1-08
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    School Ties; Leveling Policy; Labor Market; South Korea;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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