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Employee stock options pricing and the implication of restricted exercise price: evidence from Taiwan

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  • Chia-Ying Chan

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  • Ling-Chu Lee
  • Ming-Chun Wang

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Chia-Ying Chan & Ling-Chu Lee & Ming-Chun Wang, 2010. "Employee stock options pricing and the implication of restricted exercise price: evidence from Taiwan," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 247-271, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:34:y:2010:i:2:p:247-271
    DOI: 10.1007/s11156-010-0166-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Smith, Clifford Jr. & Watts, Ross L., 1992. "The investment opportunity set and corporate financing, dividend, and compensation policies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 263-292, December.
    2. Elettra Agliardi & Rainer Andergassen, 2005. "Incentives of Stock Option Based Compensation," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 21-32, August.
    3. Hemmer, Thomas & Matsunaga, Steve & Shevlin, Terry, 1996. "The influence of risk diversification on the early exercise of employee stock options by executive officers," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 45-68, February.
    4. Berger, Philip G & Ofek, Eli & Yermack, David L, 1997. " Managerial Entrenchment and Capital Structure Decisions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1411-1438, September.
    5. Jennifer J. Gaver & Kenneth M. Gaver, 1995. "Compensation Policy and the Investment Opportunity Set," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 24(1), Spring.
    6. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "Law and Finance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1113-1155, December.
    7. Brenner, Menachem & Sundaram, Rangarajan K. & Yermack, David, 2000. "Altering the terms of executive stock options," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 103-128, July.
    8. Tehranian, Hassan & Waegelein, James F., 1985. "Market reaction to short-term executive compensation plan adoption," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1-3), pages 131-144, April.
    9. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-De-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 1999. "Corporate Ownership Around the World," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(2), pages 471-517, April.
    10. DeFusco, Richard A & Johnson, Robert R & Zorn, Thomas S, 1990. " The Effect of Executive Stock Option Plans on Stockholders and Bondholders," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 617-627, June.
    11. Ronald Balvers & Yangru Wu & Erik Gilliland, 2000. "Mean Reversion across National Stock Markets and Parametric Contrarian Investment Strategies," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 745-772, April.
    12. Jensen, Michael C & Murphy, Kevin J, 1990. "Performance Pay and Top-Management Incentives," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(2), pages 225-264, April.
    13. Ding, David K. & Sun, Qian, 2001. "Causes and effects of employee stock option plans: Evidence from Singapore," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 9(5), pages 563-599, November.
    14. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1985. "Using daily stock returns : The case of event studies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-31, March.
    15. Eberhart, Allan C., 2005. "Employee stock options as warrants," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 2409-2433, October.
    16. Brian J. Hall & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 1998. "Are CEOs Really Paid Like Bureaucrats?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 653-691.
    17. Seppo Ikaheimo & Anders Kjellman & Jan Holmberg & Sari Jussila, 2004. "Employee stock option plans and stock market reaction: evidence from Finland," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 105-122.
    18. repec:hrv:faseco:30747162 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Huddart, Steven & Lang, Mark, 1996. "Employee stock option exercises an empirical analysis," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 5-43, February.
    20. Swee-Sum Lam & Bey-Fen Chng, 2006. "Do executive stock option grants have value implications for firm performance?," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 249-274, May.
    21. Preeti Choudhary & Shivaram Rajgopal & Mohan Venkatachalam, 2009. "Accelerated Vesting of Employee Stock Options in Anticipation of FAS 123-R," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 105-146, March.
    22. Huddart, Steven, 1994. "Employee stock options," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 207-231, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jerry Yang & Willard Carleton, 2011. "Repricing of executive stock options," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 459-490, April.
    2. Chia-Ying Chan & Vivian W. Tai & Kuo-An Li & Ranko Jelic, 2012. "Do Market Participants Favor Employee Stock Option Schemes? Evidence from Taiwan," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(0), pages 110-132, January.
    3. Chia-Ying Chan & Vivian W. Tai & Kuo-An Li & Ranko Jelic, 2012. "Do Market Participants Favor Employee Stock Option Schemes? Evidence from Taiwan," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(0), pages 110-132, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employee stock options; Restricted exercise price; Agency problem; Option pricing model; C31; C32; C63; G13;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing

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