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A cohort analysis of female labor participation rates in the U.S. and Japan

  • Kosei Fukuda

    ()

Aggregate data of female labor participation rates in U.S. and Japan, classified by period and by age, are decomposed into age, period, and cohort effects using innovative Bayesian cohort models that were developed to overcome the identification problem in cohort analysis. The main findings are that in both countries, age effects are the largest and period effects are the smallest; in both countries, age effects are roughly consistent with life-cycle movements expected by labor economics, but the negative effects of marriage and/or childbearing on women?’s labor supply in Japan are much larger than those observed in the U.S.; and in both countries, upward movements of cohort effects during 1930s–1960s were found. However, cohort effects are larger for the U.S. than for Japan. All the cohort results are roughly consistent with the marriage squeeze hypothesis and the Easterlin hypothesis. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11150-006-0013-4
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

Volume (Year): 4 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 379-393

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Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:4:y:2006:i:4:p:379-393
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

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  1. Nakamura, Jiro & Ueda, Atsuko, 1999. "On the Determinants of Career Interruption by Childbirth among Married Women in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 73-89, March.
  2. Shoshana Grossbard & Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, 2005. "Marriage Markets and Married Women’s Labor Force Participation," Working Papers 0013, San Diego State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Van Der Klaauw, W., 1993. "Female Labor Supply and Marital Status Decisions: A Life Cycle Model," Working Papers 93-23, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  4. Richard Blundell & Thomas MaCurdy, 1998. "Labour supply: a review of alternative approaches," IFS Working Papers W98/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Shimada, Haruo & Higuchi, Yoshio, 1985. "An Analysis of Trends in Female Labor Force Participation in Japan," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages S355-74, January.
  6. Kosei Fukuda, 2006. "Age-period-cohort decomposition of aggregate data: an application to US and Japanese household saving rates," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(7), pages 981-998.
  7. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M, 1997. "Wage Inequality and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 72-97, January.
  8. Paxson, Christina, 1996. "Saving and growth: Evidence from micro data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 255-288, February.
  9. Jonathan A. Parker, 2000. "Spendthrift in America? On Two Decades of Decline in the U.S. Saving Rate," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999, Volume 14, pages 317-387 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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