IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/soceco/v37y2008i6p2214-2220.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Empirical evidence on intergenerational inequality of tax burdens in the U.S. and Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Fukuda, Kosei

Abstract

Aggregate data of tax burdens in the U.S. and Japan, classified by period and by age, are decomposed into age, period, and cohort effects using the Bayesian cohort models which were developed to overcome the identification problem in cohort analysis. Main findings are that in both countries the age effects are the largest and the cohort effects are obscure or negligible and that in both countries significant intergenerational inequality is not observed.

Suggested Citation

  • Fukuda, Kosei, 2008. "Empirical evidence on intergenerational inequality of tax burdens in the U.S. and Japan," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2214-2220, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:6:p:2214-2220
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5H-4S92TMG-1/2/6813a9344336537924e40f855a9facae
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ablett, John & Tseggai-Bocurezion, Zaid, 2000. "Lifetime Net Average Tax Rates in Australia since Federation--A Generational Accounting Study," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(233), pages 139-151, June.
    2. Paxson, Christina, 1996. "Saving and growth: Evidence from micro data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 255-288, February.
    3. Linz, Susan J., 2004. "Motivating Russian workers: analysis of age and gender differences," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 261-289, July.
    4. Angus S. Deaton & Christina Paxson, 1994. "Saving, Growth, and Aging in Taiwan," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in the Economics of Aging, pages 331-362 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Alan J. Auerbach & Jagadeesh Gokhale & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 1991. "Generational Accounts: A Meaningful Alternative to Deficit Accounting," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 5, pages 55-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Yosihiko Ogata, 2000. "Empirical Bayes Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Retrospective Incidence Data," Scandinavian Journal of Statistics, Danish Society for Theoretical Statistics;Finnish Statistical Society;Norwegian Statistical Association;Swedish Statistical Association, vol. 27(3), pages 415-432.
    7. Kosei Fukuda, 2007. "An empirical analysis of US and Japanese health insurance using age-period-cohort decomposition," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(5), pages 475-489.
    8. Ribar, David C. & Wilhelm, Mark O., 2006. "Exchange, role modeling and the intergenerational transmission of elder support attitudes: Evidence from three generations of Mexican-Americans," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 514-531, June.
    9. Orazio P. Attanasio, 1998. "Cohort Analysis of Saving Behavior by U.S. Households," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(3), pages 575-609.
    10. Jonathan A. Parker, 2000. "Spendthrift in America? On Two Decades of Decline in the U.S. Saving Rate," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999, Volume 14, pages 317-387 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. David Altig, 2001. "Simulating Fundamental Tax Reform in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 574-595, June.
    12. Kosei Fukuda, 2006. "Age-period-cohort decomposition of aggregate data: an application to US and Japanese household saving rates," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(7), pages 981-998.
    13. Kosei Fukuda, 2006. "A cohort analysis of female labor participation rates in the U.S. and Japan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 379-393, December.
    14. Keuschnigg, Christian, 1994. "Dynamic tax incidence and intergenerationally neutral reform," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 343-366, February.
    15. Ben J. Heijdra & Jenny E. Ligthart, 2002. "Tax Policy, the Macroeconomy, and Intergenerational Distribution," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 49(1), pages 1-6.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Marina Malkina & Rodion Balakin, 2015. "Correlation Assessment of Tax System Risk and Profitability in the Russian Regions," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(3), pages 241-255.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:6:p:2214-2220. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.