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Having Kids Later. Economic Analyses for Industrialized Countries

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  • Siv Gustafsson

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Abstract

Main trends are presented on fertility, age of the mother at having her first child, and time that young people spend in fulltime education. Fertility is declining and is now well below the population replacement rate in all European countries. To some extent the fertility decline is caused by postponement of motherhood in the sense that the decline would have been smaller if mothers of successive generations were not getting increasingly old. But why are women and men forming families so late, and what role is played by the extension of formal education? Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Siv Gustafsson, 2005. "Having Kids Later. Economic Analyses for Industrialized Countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 5-16, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:3:y:2005:i:1:p:5-16
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-004-0977-x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11150-004-0977-x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesca Modena & Concetta Rondinelli & Fabio Sabatini, 2014. "Economic Insecurity and Fertility Intentions: The Case of Italy," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S1), pages 233-255, May.
    2. María Davia & Nuria Legazpe, 2015. "Educational attainment and maternity in Spain: not only “when” but also “how”," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 871-900, December.
    3. Suzana Koelet & Helga A.G. De Valk & Ignace Glorieux & Ilse Laurijssen & Didier Willaert, 2015. "The timing of family commitments in the early work career," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(22), pages 657-690, March.
    4. Concetta Rondinelli & Arnstein Aassve & Francesco Billari, 2010. "Women´s wages and childbearing decisions: Evidence from Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(19), pages 549-578, April.
    5. Rozemarijn Dereuddre & Bart Van de Putte & Piet Bracke, 2016. "Ready, Willing, and Able: Contraceptive Use Patterns Across Europe," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(4), pages 543-573, October.

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