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Get High and Get Stupid: The Effect of Alcohol and Marijuana Use on Teen Sexual Behavior

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  • Michael Grossman

    ()

  • Robert Kaestner

    ()

  • Sara Markowitz

    ()

Abstract

Numerous studies have documented a strong correlation between substance use and teen sexual behavior, and this empirical relationship has given rise to a widespread belief that substance use causes teens to engage in risky sex. This causal link is often used by advocates to justify policies targeted at reducing substance use. Here, we argue that previous research has not produced sufficient evidence to substantiate a causal relationship between substance use and teen sexual behavior. Accordingly, we attempt to estimate causal effects using two complementary research approaches. Our findings suggest that substance use is not causally related to teen sexual behavior, although we cannot definitively rule out that possibility.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Grossman & Robert Kaestner & Sara Markowitz, 2004. "Get High and Get Stupid: The Effect of Alcohol and Marijuana Use on Teen Sexual Behavior," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 413-441, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:2:y:2004:i:4:p:413-441
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-004-5655-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    sexual behavior; substance use;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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