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The impact of state regulations on nursing home care practices

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  • John Bowblis

    ()

  • Judith Lucas

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • John Bowblis & Judith Lucas, 2012. "The impact of state regulations on nursing home care practices," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 52-72, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:42:y:2012:i:1:p:52-72
    DOI: 10.1007/s11149-012-9183-6
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11149-012-9183-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Patricia K. Tong, 2011. "The effects of California minimum nurse staffing laws on nurse labor and patient mortality in skilled nursing facilities," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 802-816, July.
    2. Cawley, John & Grabowski, David C. & Hirth, Richard A., 2006. "Factor substitution in nursing homes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 234-247, March.
    3. David Grabowski & John Bowblis & Judith Lucas & Stephen Crystal, 2011. "Labor Prices and the Treatment of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 273-292.
    4. V. Joseph Hotz & Mo Xiao, 2011. "The Impact of Regulations on the Supply and Quality of Care in Child Care Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1775-1805, August.
    5. Stafford, Sarah L, 2003. "Assessing the Effectiveness of State Regulation and Enforcement of Hazardous Waste," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 27-41, January.
    6. David Sappington, 2005. "Regulating Service Quality: A Survey," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 123-154, November.
    7. Wayne B. Gray & Jay P. Shimshack, 2011. "The Effectiveness of Environmental Monitoring and Enforcement: A Review of the Empirical Evidence," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 5(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
    8. Carl Shapiro, 1986. "Investment, Moral Hazard, and Occupational Licensing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(5), pages 843-862.
    9. James W. McKie, 1970. "Regulation and the Free Market: The Problem of Boundaries," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 1(1), pages 6-26, Spring.
    10. John R. Bowblis & Stephen Crystal & Orna Intrator & Judith A. Lucas, 2012. "Response To Regulatory Stringency: The Case Of Antipsychotic Medication Use In Nursing Homes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(8), pages 977-993, August.
    11. David C. Grabowski, 2004. "A Longitudinal Study of Medicaid Payment, Private-Pay Price and Nursing Home Quality," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 5-26, March.
    12. Leland, Hayne E, 1979. "Quacks, Lemons, and Licensing: A Theory of Minimum Quality Standards," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1328-1346, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Laura Di Giorgio & Massimo Filippini & Giuliano Masiero, 2014. "The relationship between costs and quality in nonprofit nursing homes," IdEP Economic Papers 1402, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    2. Yaa Akosa Antwi & John R. Bowblis, 2016. "The Impact of Nurse Turnover on Quality of Care and Mortality in Nursing Homes: Evidence from the Great Recession," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-249, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    3. L. Di Giorgio & M. Filippini & G. Masiero, 2016. "Is higher nursing home quality more costly?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(8), pages 1011-1026, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regulation; Offsetting behavior; Minimum quality standards; Nursing homes; Quality; I18; I12; L51;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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