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Wealth Inequality Among Immigrants: Consistent Racial/Ethnic Inequality in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew A. Painter

    () (University of Wyoming)

  • Zhenchao Qian

    () (Brown University)

Abstract

Abstract Wealth is a strong indicator of immigrant integration in U.S. society. Drawing on new assimilation theory, we highlight the importance of racial/ethnic group boundaries and propose different paths of wealth integration among U.S. immigrants. Using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation and quantile regression, we show that race/ethnicity shapes immigrant wealth inequality across the entire distribution of net worth, along with immigrants’ U.S. experience, such as immigrant status, U.S. education, English language proficiency, and time spent in the United States. Our results document consistent racial/ethnic inequality among immigrants, also evidenced among the U.S. born, revealing that even when accounting for key aspects of U.S. experience, wealth inequality with whites for Latino and black immigrants is strong.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew A. Painter & Zhenchao Qian, 2016. "Wealth Inequality Among Immigrants: Consistent Racial/Ethnic Inequality in the United States," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(2), pages 147-175, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:35:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s11113-016-9385-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-016-9385-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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