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The Retirement Life Course in America at the Dawn of the Twenty-First Century

  • David Warner

    ()

  • Mark Hayward
  • Melissa Hardy
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    No abstract is available for this item.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11113-009-9173-2
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Population Research and Policy Review.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 6 (December)
    Pages: 893-919

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:29:y:2010:i:6:p:893-919
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102983

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    1. Kevin E. Cahill & Michael D. Giandrea & Joseph F. Quinn, 2005. "Are Traditional Retirements a Thing of the Past? New Evidence on Retirement Patterns and Bridge Jobs," Working Papers 384, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    2. Courtney Coile & Phillip B. Levine, 2009. "The Market Crash and Mass Layoffs: How the Current Economic Crisis May Affect Retirement," NBER Working Papers 15395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Leora Friedberg, 1999. "The Labor Supply Effects of the Social Security Earnings Test," NBER Working Papers 7200, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly & Andrew J. Houtenville & Nigar Nargis, 2002. "Self-reported work limitation data: what they can and cannot tell us," Working Paper Series 2002-22, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    5. John Bound & Michael Schoenbaum & Todd R. Stinebrickner & Timothy Waidmann, 1998. "The Dynamic Effects of Health on the Labor Force Transitions of Older Workers," NBER Working Papers 6777, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jonathan Gruber & Peter Orszag, 2000. "Does the Social Security Earnings Test Affect Labor Supply and Benefits Receipt?," NBER Working Papers 7923, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Joseph F. Quinn, 1993. "Retirement And The Labor Force Behavior Of The Elderly," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 257, Boston College Department of Economics.
    8. Alicia H. Munnell & Anthony Webb & Francesca Golub-Sass, 2009. "The National Retirement Risk Index: After The Crash," Issues in Brief ib2009-9-22, Center for Retirement Research, revised Sep 2009.
    9. Barry T. Hirsch & David A. Macpherson & Melissa A. Hardy, 2000. "Occupational age structure and access for older workers," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(3), pages 401-418, April.
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