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How much does income matter in neighborhood choice?

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  • William Clark

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  • Valerie Ledwith

Abstract

There is a substantial literature on the residential mobility process itself and a smaller contribution on how households make neighborhood choices, especially with respect to racial composition. We extend that literature by evaluating the role of income and socioeconomic status in the neighborhood choice process for minorities. We use individual household data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Study to investigate the comparative choices of white and Hispanic households in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. We show that income and education are important explanations for the likelihood of choosing neighborhoods. But at the same time, own race preferences clearly play a role. While whites with more income choose more white neighborhoods, Hispanics with more income choose less Hispanic neighborhoods. One interpretation is that both groups are translating resources, such as income and education, into residence in whiter and ostensibly, higher status neighborhoods. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Suggested Citation

  • William Clark & Valerie Ledwith, 2007. "How much does income matter in neighborhood choice?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 26(2), pages 145-161, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:26:y:2007:i:2:p:145-161
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-007-9026-9
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11113-007-9026-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    2. Richard Alba & John Logan, 1991. "Variations on two themes: Racial and ethnic patterns in the attainment of suburban residence," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(3), pages 431-453, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeremy Pais & Scott South & Kyle Crowder, 2009. "White Flight Revisited: A Multiethnic Perspective on Neighborhood Out-Migration," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(3), pages 321-346, June.
    2. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-018-0672-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. van Ham, Maarten & Boschman, Sanne & Vogel, Matt, 2017. "Incorporating Neighbourhood Choice in a Model of Neighbourhood Effects on Income," IZA Discussion Papers 10694, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Zwiers, Merle & van Ham, Maarten & Manley, David, 2016. "Trajectories of Neighborhood Change: Spatial Patterns of Increasing Ethnic Diversity," IZA Discussion Papers 10216, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. William Clark & Regan Maas, 2012. "Schools, Neighborhoods and Selection: Outcomes Across Metropolitan Los Angeles," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(3), pages 339-360, June.

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