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Residential Asking Rents and Time on the Market

Author

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  • Marcus Allen

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  • Ronald Rutherford
  • Thomas Thomson

Abstract

Landlords offering a house in the rental market face a difficult strategic pricing decision. The revenue maximizing decision for the landlord involves a tradeoff between the rental rate and time on the market. Because the turnover of renters is higher than owners, and because the landlord must bear some carrying costs on a vacant house, pricing the rent too high may decrease revenue due to a higher vacancy period and pricing it too low may reduce the revenue when occupied. While there is substantial research on the relationship between listed prices and time on the market for freehold interests, this is the first study to provide empirical evidence on the relationship between asking rent, contract rent and time on the market for single family residential rental (leasehold) property interests. We present two models; a rental price model and a duration model for time-on-the market. Using data from the Dallas–Fort Worth area we find that landlords who set a lower asking rent relative to predicted rent can expect a shorter marketing period for their properties. The results also indicate that overpricing the asking rent and then lowering it at a later date leads to a longer marketing time (after the reset) and often a lower rent. These finding are reasonably robust for low-, mid-, and higher-valued rental properties. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Suggested Citation

  • Marcus Allen & Ronald Rutherford & Thomas Thomson, 2009. "Residential Asking Rents and Time on the Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 351-365, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrefec:v:38:y:2009:i:4:p:351-365
    DOI: 10.1007/s11146-007-9092-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Han Bin Kang & Mona J. Gardner, 1989. "Selling Price and Marketing Time in the Residential Real Estate Market," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 4(1), pages 21-35.
    2. James R. Frew & G. Donald Jud & Daniel T. Winkler, 1990. "Atypicalities and Apartment Rent Concessions," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 5(2), pages 195-202.
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    6. John R. Knight & C. F. Sirmans & Geoffrey K. Turnbull, 1998. "List Price Information in Residential Appraisal and Underwriting," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 15(1), pages 59-76.
    7. Anglin, Paul M & Rutherford, Ronald & Springer, Thomas M, 2003. "The Trade-Off Between the Selling Price of Residential Properties and Time-on-the-Market: The Impact of Price Setting," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 95-111, January.
    8. Horowitz, Joel L, 1992. "The Role of the List Price in Housing Markets: Theory and an Econometric Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(2), pages 115-129, April-Jun.
    9. James Valente & ShanShan Wu & Alan Gelfand & C.F. Sirmans, 2005. "Apartment Rent Prediction Using Spatial Modeling," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 27(1), pages 105-136.
    10. John R. Knight & C.F. Sirmans & Geoffrey K. Turnbull, 1994. "List price signaling and buyer behavior in the housing market," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, pages 177-195.
    11. Donald Haurin, 1988. "The Duration of Marketing Time of Residential Housing," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 16(4), pages 396-410.
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    13. Emily Norman Zietz, 2003. "Multifamily Housing: A Review of Theory and Evidence," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 25(2), pages 185-244.
    14. John R. Knight, 2002. "Listing Price, Time on Market, and Ultimate Selling Price: Causes and Effects of Listing Price Changes," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 30(2), pages 213-237.
    15. Jacob Belkin & Donald J. Hempel & Dennis W. McLeavey, 1976. "An Empirical Study of Time on Market Using Multidimensional Segmentation of Housing Markets," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 4(2), pages 57-75.
    16. Norman G. Miller & Michael A. Sklarz, 1987. "Pricing Strategies and Residential Property Selling Prices," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 2(1), pages 31-40.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Mc Breen & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Pablo Jensen, 2009. "An Agent-Based Simulation of Rental Housing Markets," Post-Print halshs-00374157, HAL.
    2. Crocker H. Liu & Adam Nowak & Stuart Rosenthal, 2014. "Bubbles, Post-Crash Dynamics, and the Housing Market," Working Papers 14-18, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    3. John Mc Breen & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Pablo Jensen, 2011. "Information and Search on the Housing Market: An Agent-based Model," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1395, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Füss, Roland & Koller, Jan A., 2016. "The role of spatial and temporal structure for residential rent predictions," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 1352-1368.
    5. Carrillo, Paul E. & Pope, Jaren C., 2012. "Are homes hot or cold potatoes? The distribution of marketing time in the housing market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 189-197.
    6. Liu, Crocker H. & Nowak, Adam & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2016. "Housing price bubbles, new supply, and within-city dynamics," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 55-72.
    7. Nasser Daneshvary & Terrence Clauretie, 2013. "Agent Change and Seller Bargaining Power: A Case of Principal Agent Problem in the Housing Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 416-433, October.

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