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Phased Retirement for Older Workers in Taiwan

  • Jennjou Chen

    ()

  • Ching-Hsiang Chuang

    ()

Working part-time has become a popular option during transition from a full-time career job to full retirement among older workers all over the world. Five waves of The Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan, from 1989 to 2003, are used to study older workers’ part-time work behaviors. The data confirm that more than 20% of full-time older workers with at least 10 years of job tenure do not fully retire from their career jobs. Moreover, there exists a significant proportion of older workers who stay with their career jobs and work part-time. We found that due to pension regulations, public sector employees are less likely to stay with their long-term employers and use phased retirement options. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-012-9285-4
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

Volume (Year): 33 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 328-337

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:33:y:2012:i:3:p:328-337
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  1. Denis LATULIPPE & John TURNER, 2000. "Partial retirement and pension policy in industrialized countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 139(2), pages 179-195, 06.
  2. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1981. "Partial Retirement and the Analysis of Retirement Behavior," NBER Working Papers 0763, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Joseph F. Quinn & Richard V. Burkhauser & Daniel A. Myers, 1990. "Passing the Torch: The Influence of Economic Incentives on Work and Retirement," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number pt, March.
  4. Robert M. Hutchens & Karen Grace-Martin, 2006. "Employer willingness to permit phased retirement: Why are some more willing than others?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(4), pages 525-546, July.
  5. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1982. "Partial Retirement and Wage Profiles of Older Workers," NBER Working Papers 1000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Mark Hayward & William Grady & Melissa Hardy & David Sommers, 1989. "Occupational influences on retirement, disability, and death," Demography, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 393-409, August.
  7. Hutchens, Robert, 2010. "Worker characteristics, job characteristics, and opportunities for phased retirement," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 1010-1021, December.
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