IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jbuset/v130y2015i4p767-774.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Case for Consumer Social Responsibility (CnSR): Including a Selected Review of Consumer Ethics/Social Responsibility Research

Author

Listed:
  • Scott Vitell

    ()

Abstract

The literature is replete with articles emphasizing the importance of corporate social responsibility. However, few, if any, of these articles discuss the role of the consumer in achieving corporate social responsibility. It is the premise of the current paper that it may be difficult for corporate social responsibility to succeed without the assistance of consumers. That is, for corporate social responsibility to flourish, it needs to be accompanied by consumer social responsibility (CnSR). This paper examines this proposition, makes the distinction between consumer ethics and CnSR, and presents research in these two expanding areas of inquiry, examining literature which supports the role of CnSR in complementing corporate social responsibility. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Scott Vitell, 2015. "A Case for Consumer Social Responsibility (CnSR): Including a Selected Review of Consumer Ethics/Social Responsibility Research," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 130(4), pages 767-774, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:130:y:2015:i:4:p:767-774
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-014-2110-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10551-014-2110-2
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pat Auger & Timothy Devinney, 2007. "Do What Consumers Say Matter? The Misalignment of Preferences with Unconstrained Ethical Intentions," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 76(4), pages 361-383, December.
    2. Magdalena Öberseder & Bodo Schlegelmilch & Verena Gruber, 2011. "“Why Don’t Consumers Care About CSR?”: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Role of CSR in Consumption Decisions," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 104(4), pages 449-460, December.
    3. Sandro Castaldo & Francesco Perrini & Nicola Misani & Antonio Tencati, 2009. "The Missing Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Trust: The Case of Fair Trade Products," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 84(1), pages 1-15, January.
    4. Tierney Bondy & Vishal Talwar, 2011. "Through Thick and Thin: How Fair Trade Consumers Have Reacted to the Global Economic Recession," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 101(3), pages 365-383, July.
    5. Alan Pomering & Sara Dolnicar, 2009. "Assessing the Prerequisite of Successful CSR Implementation: Are Consumers Aware of CSR Initiatives?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 85(2), pages 285-301, April.
    6. Ye Cai & Hoje Jo & Carrie Pan, 2012. "Doing Well While Doing Bad? CSR in Controversial Industry Sectors," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 108(4), pages 467-480, July.
    7. Dale Russell & Cristel Russell, 2010. "Here or there? Consumer reactions to corporate social responsibility initiatives: Egocentric tendencies and their moderators," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 65-81, March.
    8. Smith, N. Craig & Palazzo, Guido & Bhattacharya, C. B., 2010. "Marketing’s Consequences: Stakeholder Marketing and Supply Chain Corporate Social Responsibility Issues," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(04), pages 617-641, October.
    9. Jerome Vanclay & John Shortiss & Scott Aulsebrook & Angus Gillespie & Ben Howell & Rhoda Johanni & Michael Maher & Kelly Mitchell & Mark Stewart & Jim Yates, 2011. "Customer Response to Carbon Labelling of Groceries," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 153-160, March.
    10. Bala Ramasamy & Matthew Yeung & Alan Au, 2010. "Consumer Support for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): The Role of Religion and Values," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 91(1), pages 61-72, February.
    11. Muncy, James A. & Vitell, Scott J., 1992. "Consumer ethics: An investigation of the ethical beliefs of the final consumer," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 297-311, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Brendan F. D. Barrett & Ralph Horne & John Fien, 2016. "The Ethical City: A Rationale for an Urgent New Urban Agenda," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-14, November.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:130:y:2015:i:4:p:767-774. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.