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Fairness in a tradeable-permit treaty for carbon emissions reductions in Europe and the former Soviet Union

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  • Peter Bohm
  • Bjorn Larsen

Abstract

This paper evaluates the distributional implications of alternative permit allocations in a tradeable permit regime for carbon emissions reductions (20% below baseline) in 2010 for a region consisting of Europe and the states of the former Soviet Union (FSU). Participation in such a regime is expected to hinge on the “fairness” of the distributional consequences. We find that initial permit allocations by populationand/or GDP are unlikely to induce participation by most countries of Eastern Europe and FSU because of the net costs involved. We identify a set of initial allocations that would at least compensate these countries. A fair treatment of the countries in Western Europe (WE) is here one which equalizes net costs perGDP. For a wide set of cost functions for carbon emission reductions, the cost gains that WE would reap from a tradeable permit system relative to unilateral reductions by WE as a group are found to be on the order of 85 percent. This would imply, among other things, a significant increase in WE'scapacity to make further emissions reductions. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Bohm & Bjorn Larsen, 1994. "Fairness in a tradeable-permit treaty for carbon emissions reductions in Europe and the former Soviet Union," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 4(3), pages 219-239, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:4:y:1994:i:3:p:219-239
    DOI: 10.1007/BF00692325
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Böhringer, Christoph & Welsch, Heinz, 1999. "C & C - contraction and convergence of carbon emissions: the economic implications of permit trading," ZEW Discussion Papers 99-13, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Zhou, P. & Wang, M., 2016. "Carbon dioxide emissions allocation: A review," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 47-59.
    3. Karp, Larry & Liu, Xuemei, 1999. "Valuing Tradeable CO2 Permits for OECD Countries," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt5dv5c8hr, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
    4. Cui, Lian-Biao & Fan, Ying & Zhu, Lei & Bi, Qing-Hua, 2014. "How will the emissions trading scheme save cost for achieving China’s 2020 carbon intensity reduction target?," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 1043-1052.
    5. Sotelsek, Daniel F. & Azqueta Oyarzún, Diego, 1999. "Comparative advantages and the exploitation of environmental resources," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    6. GERMAIN, Marc & VAN STEENBERGHE, Vincent, 2001. "Constraining equitable allocations of tradable greenhouse gases emission quotas by acceptability," CORE Discussion Papers 2001005, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    7. Kampas, Athanasios & Mamalis, Spyridon, 2006. "Assessing the Distributional Impacts of Transferable Pollution Permits: The Case of Phosphorus Pollution Management at a River Basin Scale," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 7(2), August.
    8. Yongbin Zhu & Zheng Wang, 2014. "An Optimal Balanced Economic Growth and Abatement Pathway for China Under the Carbon Emissions Budget," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 44(2), pages 253-268, August.
    9. Liski, Matti, 2001. "Thin versus Thick CO2 Market," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 295-311, May.
    10. Kampas, Athanasios & White, Ben, 2003. "Selecting permit allocation rules for agricultural pollution control: a bargaining solution," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 135-147, December.
    11. Olivier Godard, 2011. "Climate justice, between global and international justice -Insights from justification theory," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/56, European University Institute.
    12. Josef Sejak & Martin Kupka, 2003. "Can the Czech Republic Participate in Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading?," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 269-292, September.
    13. Jie Wu, Ying Fan, Yan Xia, 2016. "The Economic Effects of Initial Quota Allocations on Carbon Emissions Trading in China," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(China Spe).
    14. Peter Bohm & Björn Carlén, 2002. "A Cost-effective Approach to Attracting Low-income Countries to International Emissions Trading: Theory and Experiments," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(2), pages 187-211, October.

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