IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aen/journl/1991v12-02-a06.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Efficient International Agreements for Reducing Emissions of CO2

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Hoel

Abstract

International agreements are necessary to achieve significant reductions of emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. Traditional agreements of the type "uniform percent reductions" have two disadvantages: in the first place, it would probably be difficult to get a sufficiently large participation in such an agreement, since it gives a distribution of costs of reducing emissions which may differ strongly from the advantages the countries have from avoiding climatic changes. In the second place, agreements of this type are generally not efficient. An international CO2 tar and tradeable CO2 quotas are two alternative schemes which have several common features, and which both are (almost) efficient under reasonable conditions. With appropriately chosen tax reimbursements in the case of a CO2 tax or initial distribution of quotas in the case of tradeable quotas, it is possible to make all, or at least almost al4 countries better off with the agreement than without.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Hoel, 1991. "Efficient International Agreements for Reducing Emissions of CO2," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 93-108.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1991v12-02-a06
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.iaee.org/en/publications/ejarticle.aspx?id=2048
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to IAEE members and subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, ZhongXiang & Baranzini, Andrea, 2004. "What do we know about carbon taxes? An inquiry into their impacts on competitiveness and distribution of income," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 507-518, March.
    2. ZhongXiang Zhang & Lucas Assunao, 2004. "Domestic Climate Policies and the WTO," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 359-386, March.
    3. Anwar Shah & Bjorn Larsen, 2014. "Carbon taxes, the greenhouse effect, and developing countries," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(1), pages 353-402, May.
    4. Rohling, Moritz & Ohndorf, Markus, 2012. "Prices vs. Quantities with fiscal cushioning," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 169-187.
    5. Parry, Ian W. H. & Williams, Roberton III & Goulder, Lawrence H., 1999. "When Can Carbon Abatement Policies Increase Welfare? The Fundamental Role of Distorted Factor Markets," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 52-84, January.
    6. Luisito Bertinelli & Amer Tabakovic & Luca Marchiori & Benteng Zou, 2015. "Transboundary Pollution Abatement: The Impact of Unilateral Commitment in Differential Games," CREA Discussion Paper Series 15-02, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    7. Lars Håkonsen & Lars Mathiesen, 1997. "CO 2 -stabilization may be a ‘no-regrets’ policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 171-198, March.
    8. Gardner Brown, 2000. "Renewable Natural Resource Management and Use Without Markets," Working Papers 0025, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    9. Gilles Rotillon & Tarik Tazdaït, 1996. "International bargaining in the presence of global environmental change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(3), pages 293-314, October.
    10. Copeland, Brian R. & Taylor, M. Scott, 2005. "Free trade and global warming: a trade theory view of the Kyoto protocol," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-234, March.
    11. Simonis, Udo E., 1996. "Steuern, joint implementation, Zertifikate: zum Instrumentarium der Weltumweltpolitik," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 102-118.
    12. Halkos, George, 1993. "Economic incentives for optimal sulphur abatement in Europe," MPRA Paper 33705, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Shiell, Leslie, 2003. "Descriptive, prescriptive and second-best approaches to the control of global greenhouse gas emissions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(7-8), pages 1431-1452, August.
    14. M. Murty, 1996. "Fiscal federalism approach for controlling global environmental pollution," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(4), pages 449-459, December.
    15. Cristina Grazia & François Gusdorf & Abdelhakim Hammoudi, 2014. "Climate Change, Heterogeneities, and Stability of International Fiscal Harmonization," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 58(4), pages 579-603, August.
    16. Gilles Rotillon & Tazdaït Tarik, 2003. "Coopération internationale et problèmes environnementaux globaux : vision normative versus vision positive," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 11(1), pages 101-134.
    17. Michael Hoel, 1993. "Harmonization of carbon taxes in international climate agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(3), pages 221-231, June.
    18. M. Gallastegui & M. González-Eguino & I. Galarraga, 2012. "Cost effectiveness of a combination of instruments for global warming: a quantitative approach for Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 111-132, March.
    19. ZhongXiang Zhang & Henk Folmer, 1995. "The choice of policy instruments for the control of carbon dioxide emissions," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 30(3), pages 133-142, May.
    20. Peter Bohm & Bjorn Larsen, 1994. "Fairness in a tradeable-permit treaty for carbon emissions reductions in Europe and the former Soviet Union," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 4(3), pages 219-239, June.
    21. Rotillon, Gilles & Tazdait, Tarik & Zeghni, Sylvain, 1996. "Bilateral or multilateral bargaining in the face of global environmental change?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 177-187, August.
    22. Larsen, Bjorn & Shah, Anwar, 1994. "Global Tradeable Carbon Permits, Participation Incentives, and Transfers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 841-856, Supplemen.
    23. Xepapadeas, A., 1995. "Induced technical change and international agreements under greenhouse warming," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-23, May.
    24. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Lønning, Dag & Rasmussen, Heine, 1995. "An Analysis of International CO2 agreements," MPRA Paper 10753, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. Gardner M. Brown, 2000. "Renewable Natural Resource Management and Use without Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 875-914, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1991v12-02-a06. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (David Williams). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaeeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.