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Remilitarization and the End of the Gold Bloc in 1936

Author

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  • Paul Hallwood

    ()

  • Ronald MacDonald
  • Ian Marsh

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Paul Hallwood & Ronald MacDonald & Ian Marsh, 2011. "Remilitarization and the End of the Gold Bloc in 1936," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 305-321, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:159:y:2011:i:3:p:305-321
    DOI: 10.1007/s10645-011-9160-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cassiers, Isabelle, 1992. "Managing the Franc in Belgium and France: The Economic Consequences of the Exchange Rate Policies 1925-1936," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 1992019, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1973. "Devaluation, Money, and Nontraded Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(5), pages 871-880, December.
    3. Arturo Estrella & Frederic S. Mishkin, 1995. "The term structure of interest rates and its role in monetary policy for the European Central Bank," Research Paper 9526, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Wolf, Nikolaus & Ritschl, Albrecht, 2003. "Endogeneity of Currency Areas and Trade Blocs: Evidence from the Inter-War Period," Papers 2004,10, Humboldt University of Berlin, Center for Applied Statistics and Economics (CASE).
    5. Officer Lawrence H., 1993. "Gold-Point Arbitrage and Uncovered Interest Arbitrage under the 1925-1931 Dollar-Sterling Gold Standard," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 98-127, January.
    6. Cochrane, John H, 1988. "How Big Is the Random Walk in GNP?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(5), pages 893-920, October.
    7. Oosterlinck, Kim, 2003. "The bond market and the legitimacy of Vichy France," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 326-344, July.
    8. Hautcoeur, Pierre-Cyrille & Sicsic, Pierre, 1999. "Threat of a capital levy, expected devaluation and interest rates in France during the interwar period," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(01), pages 25-56, April.
    9. Paul R. Krugman, 1991. "Target Zones and Exchange Rate Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(3), pages 669-682.
    10. Wandschneider, Kirsten, 2008. "The Stability of the Interwar Gold Exchange Standard: Did Politics Matter?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(01), pages 151-181, March.
    11. Bernanke, Ben S, 1995. "The Macroeconomics of the Great Depression: A Comparative Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 1-28, February.
    12. Paul Hallwood & Ronald MacDonald & Ian W. Marsh, 2000. "An Assessment of the Causes of the Abandonment of the Gold Standard by the U.S. in 1933," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 448-459, July.
    13. Michael Bordo & Thomas Helbling & Harold James, 2007. "Swiss Exchange Rate Policy in the 1930s. Was the Delay in Devaluation Too High a Price to Pay for Conservatism?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 1-25, February.
    14. Jonathan Kirshner, 2007. "What Does Finance Want? from Appeasing Bankers: Financial Caution on the Road to War," Introductory Chapters,in: Appeasing Bankers: Financial Caution on the Road to War Princeton University Press.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    French devaluation; German remilitarization; Gold bloc; international monetary system; Gold standard; F33; N24; N44;

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • N24 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N44 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Europe: 1913-

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