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Income Inequality, Human Capital, and Income Growth: Evidence from a State-Level VAR Analysis

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  • Mark Frank

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Abstract

We use Granger causality and impulse response analysis to examine the relationship between income inequality, human capital attainment, and income growth using annual state-level data over the period 1929–2000. We find consistent evidence that the income share of the top decile Granger-causes income growth, but only weak evidence that income growth Granger-causes the top decile income share. Moreover, an impulse response analysis indicates that income growth responds negatively to permanent changes in the income share of the top decile. These findings appear to have important regional variations, however, with the more densely populated Eastern states showing the strongest associations. We also find evidence that years of schooling may Granger-cause income levels, but little evidence that years of schooling Granger-causes the top decile income share. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2009

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Frank, 2009. "Income Inequality, Human Capital, and Income Growth: Evidence from a State-Level VAR Analysis," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(2), pages 173-185, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:37:y:2009:i:2:p:173-185
    DOI: 10.1007/s11293-009-9172-z
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    Cited by:

    1. Dan S. Rickman & Shane D. Rickman, 2011. "Population Growth In High‐Amenity Nonmetropolitan Areas: What'S The Prognosis?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 863-879, December.
    2. Adelaide Duarte & Marta Simões, 2010. "Regional growth in Portugal: assessing the contribution of earnings and education inequality," GEMF Working Papers 2010-11, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    3. Marta Simões & João Andrade & Adelaide Duarte, 2013. "A regional perspective on inequality and growth in Portugal using panel cointegration analysis," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 427-451, September.
    4. Bebonchu Atems & Jason Jones, 2015. "Income inequality and economic growth: a panel VAR approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1541-1561, June.
    5. João Sousa Andrade & Adelaide Duarte & Marta Simões, 2011. "Inequality and Growth in Portugal: a time series analysis," GEMF Working Papers 2011-11, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Income inequality; Economic growth; Human capital; U.S. states; D60; I00; O40; R10;

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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