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“Following” or “attracting” the customer? Japanese Banking FDI in Europe

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  • Marc Ruhr
  • Michael Ryan

Abstract

Using firm-level Japanese FDI data on investment into 18 European countries between 1970–2000 in all industries (banking, manufacturing, wholesale/retail distribution, and business services), this study examines if the “follow the customer” (FTC) hypothesis holds for firm-level data. The results suggest that banks do follow their customers into a foreign market, as part of a larger strategy that goes beyond the FTC theory. The firm level data show that the majority of FDI into a host country occurs after the foreign bank has established operations. Policy implications of this finding include the suggestion that host economies liberalize their financial sector early in an effort to attract banking FDI which then will attract non-banking FDI rather than the reverse. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Ruhr & Michael Ryan, 2005. "“Following” or “attracting” the customer? Japanese Banking FDI in Europe," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 405-422, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:33:y:2005:i:4:p:405-422
    DOI: 10.1007/s11293-005-2869-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Victor Gorshkov, 2013. "Inward entry of Japanese banks into the Russian market," KIER Working Papers 864, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Riccardo De Bonis & Giovanni Ferri & Zeno Rotondi, 2010. "Do bank-firm relationships influence firm internationalization?," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 37, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    3. Riccardo De Bonis & Giovanni Ferri & Zeno Rotondi, 2015. "Do firm–bank relationships affect firms’ internationalization?," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 142, pages 60-80.
    4. Andrei Panibratov & Cyril Verba, 2011. "Russian Banking Sector: Key Points of International Expansion," Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies, Faculty of Economics, Vilnius University, vol. 2(1).
    5. Giovanni Ferri & Alberto Franco Pozzolo, 2009. "Bank internationalization and trade: What comes first?," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 11, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    F23; G21;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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