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The Halloween Effect and Japanese Equity Prices: Myth or Exploitable Anomaly

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  • Edwin Maberly

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  • Raylene Pierce

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Abstract

Bouman and Jacobsen (American Economic Review 92(5), 1618–1635, 2002) examine monthly stock returns for major world stock markets and conclude that returns are significantly lower during the May–October periods versus the November–April periods in 36 of 37 markets examined. They argue that, in general, the Halloween strategy outperforms the buy and hold strategy thereby casting doubt on the validity of the efficient market paradigm. More recently, Maberly and Pierce (Econ Journal Watch 1(1), 29–46, 2004) re-examine the evidence for U.S. equity prices and conclude that Bouman and Jacobsen’s results are not robust to alternative model specifications. Extending prior research, this paper examines the robustness of the Halloween strategy to alternative model specifications for Japanese equity prices. The Halloween effect is concentrated in the period prior to the introduction of Nikkei 225 index futures in September 1986. After the internationalization of Japanese financial markets in the mid-1980s, the Halloween effect disappears. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Edwin Maberly & Raylene Pierce, 2003. "The Halloween Effect and Japanese Equity Prices: Myth or Exploitable Anomaly," Asia-Pacific Financial Markets, Springer;Japanese Association of Financial Economics and Engineering, vol. 10(4), pages 319-334, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:apfinm:v:10:y:2003:i:4:p:319-334
    DOI: 10.1007/s10690-005-4240-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Brown & William Goetzmann & Takato Hiraki & Noriyoshi Shiraishi & Masahiro Watanabe, 2002. "Investor Sentiment in Japanese and U.S. Daily Mutual Fund Flows," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm274, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Apr 2008.
    2. Edwin D. Maberly & Raylene M. Pierce, 2004. "Stock Market Efficiency Withstands Another Challenge: Solving the "Sell in May/Buy after Halloween" Puzzle," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 1(1), pages 29-46, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ramona DUMITRIU & Razvan STEFANESCU, 2014. "Gone Fishin’ Effects In Returns," Risk in Contemporary Economy, "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, pages 254-261.
    2. Stefanescu, Razvan & Dumitriu, Ramona & Nistor, Costel, 2012. "Prolonged holiday effects on Romanian capital market before and after the adhesion to EU," MPRA Paper 52770, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jan 2013.
    3. repec:eme:mfipps:v:36:y:2010:i:3:p:530-542 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mostafa Saidur Rahim Khan & Naheed Rabbani, 2019. "Market Conditions and Calendar Anomalies in Japanese Stock Returns," Asia-Pacific Financial Markets, Springer;Japanese Association of Financial Economics and Engineering, vol. 26(2), pages 187-209, June.
    5. Haggard, K. Stephen & Witte, H. Douglas, 2010. "The Halloween effect: Trick or treat?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 379-387, December.
    6. Dumitriu, Ramona & Stefanescu, Razvan & Nistor, Costel, 2012. "The Halloween effect during quiet and turbulent times," MPRA Paper 41539, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Sep 2012.
    7. Dragos Stefan Oprea, 2014. "The Halloween Effect Evidence from Romania," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 4(7), pages 463-471, July.
    8. Alex Plastun & Xolani Sibande & Rangan Gupta & Mark E. Wohar, 2019. "Halloween Effect in Developed Stock Markets: A US Perspective," Working Papers 201914, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    9. Chui, David & Wing Cheng, Wui & Chi Chow, Sheung & LI, Ya, 2020. "Eastern Halloween effect: A stochastic dominance approach," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    10. Degenhardt, Thomas & Auer, Benjamin R., 2018. "The “Sell in May” effect: A review and new empirical evidence," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 169-205.
    11. Plastun, Alex & Sibande, Xolani & Gupta, Rangan & Wohar, Mark E., 2020. "Halloween Effect in developed stock markets: A historical perspective," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 130-138.
    12. Zhang, Cherry Y. & Jacobsen, Ben, 2021. "The Halloween indicator, “Sell in May and Go Away”: Everywhere and all the time," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 110(C).

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