IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/41539.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Halloween effect during quiet and turbulent times

Author

Listed:
  • Dumitriu, Ramona
  • Stefanescu, Razvan
  • Nistor, Costel

Abstract

The Halloween Effect is one of the main calendar anomalies used to challenge the Efficient Market Hypothesis. It consists in significant differences between the stock returns from two distinct periods of a year: November - April and October - May. In the last decades empirical researches revealed the decline of some important calendar anomalies from the stock markets around the world. Sometimes, such changes were caused by the passing from quiet to turbulent stages of the financial markets. In this paper we investigate the Halloween Effect presence on the stock markets from a group of 28 countries for a period of time between January 2000 and December 2011. We find that geographical position has a major influence on the Halloween Effect intensity. We also find some differences between the emerging markets and the advanced financial markets. We analyze the Halloween Effect for two periods of time: the first, from January 2000 to December 2006, corresponding to a relative quiet evolution and the second, from January 2007 to December 2011, corresponding to a turbulent evolution. The results reveal, for many stock markets, major changes between the first period of time and the second one.

Suggested Citation

  • Dumitriu, Ramona & Stefanescu, Razvan & Nistor, Costel, 2012. "The Halloween effect during quiet and turbulent times," MPRA Paper 41539, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Sep 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41539
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/41539/1/MPRA_paper_41539.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Hirshleifer & Tyler Shumway, 2003. "Good Day Sunshine: Stock Returns and the Weather," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(3), pages 1009-1032, June.
    2. Edwin Maberly & Raylene Pierce, 2003. "The Halloween Effect and Japanese Equity Prices: Myth or Exploitable Anomaly," Asia-Pacific Financial Markets, Springer;Japanese Association of Financial Economics and Engineering, vol. 10(4), pages 319-334, December.
    3. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
    4. Wessel Marquering & Johan Nisser & Toni Valla, 2006. "Disappearing anomalies: a dynamic analysis of the persistence of anomalies," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 291-302.
    5. Mark J. Kamstra & Lisa A. Kramer & Maurice D. Levi, 2003. "Winter Blues: A SAD Stock Market Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 324-343, March.
    6. Peter Hansen & Asger Lunde, 2003. "Testing the Significance of Calendar Effects," Working Papers 2003-03, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    7. Agrawal, Anup & Tandon, Kishore, 1994. "Anomalies or illusions? Evidence from stock markets in eighteen countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 83-106, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ramona DUMITRIU & Razvan STEFANESCU, 2014. "Gone Fishin’ Effects In Returns," Risk in Contemporary Economy, "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, pages 254-261.
    2. Dumitriu, Ramona & Stefanescu, Razvan, 2013. "DOW effects in returns and in volatility of stock markets during quiet and turbulent times," MPRA Paper 47218, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 02 Apr 2013.
    3. Stefanescu, Razvan & Dumitriu, Ramona & Nistor, Costel, 2012. "Prolonged holiday effects on Romanian capital market before and after the adhesion to EU," MPRA Paper 52770, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jan 2013.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Calendar Anomalies; Halloween Effect; Stock Markets;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41539. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.