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The relationship between wage growth and wage levels


  • Tricia Gladden

    (Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, DC, USA)

  • Christopher Taber

    (Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA)


We estimate the covariance between the permanent component of wages and a random coefficient on experience in models both with potential experience and with actual experience. Actual experience is allowed to be arbitrarily correlated with both the permanent component of wages and the random component on experience. We find no evidence that workers of higher ability experience faster wage growth. Our point estimates suggest that a worker with a one standard deviation higher level of permanent ability would have a return to annual potential experience that is 0.61 of a percentage point lower. The analogous point estimate for actual experience is 0.87 of a point lower. Contrary to the popular perception, wage growth among low-skill workers appears to be at least as high as that for a medium-skilled worker. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Tricia Gladden & Christopher Taber, 2009. "The relationship between wage growth and wage levels," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 914-932.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:24:y:2009:i:6:p:914-932
    DOI: 10.1002/jae.1072

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lorenzo Cappellari, 2011. "Flexicurity, wage dynamics and inequality over the life-cycle," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Economia dell'Impresa e del Lavoro ieil0064, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    2. Paul Bingley & Lorenzo Cappellari & Niels Westergård‐Nielsen, 2013. "Unemployment Insurance, Wage Dynamics and Inequality Over the Life Cycle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0, pages 341-372, May.
    3. Xi Chen & Bertrand M. Koebel, 2017. "Fixed Cost, Variable Cost, Markups and Returns to Scale," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 127, pages 61-94.

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