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Valuation ratios and long-horizon stock price predictability

Author

Listed:
  • Mark E. Wohar

    (Department of Economics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, USA)

  • David E. Rapach

    (Department of Economics, Saint Louis University, USA)

Abstract

Using annual data for 1872-1997, this paper re-examines the predictability of real stock prices based on price-dividend and price-earnings ratios. In line with the extant literature, we find significant evidence of increased long-horizon predictability; that is, the hypothesis that the current value of a valuation ratio is uncorrelated with future stock price changes cannot be rejected at short horizons but can be rejected at longer horizons based on bootstrapped critical values constructed from linear representations of the data. While increased statistical power at long horizons in finite samples provides a possible explanation for the pattern of predictability in the data, we find via Monte Carlo simulations that the power to detect predictability in finite samples does not increase at long horizons in a linear framework. An alternative explanation for the pattern of predictability in the data is nonlinearities in the underlying data-generating process. We consider exponential smooth-transition autoregressive models of the price-dividend and price-earnings ratios and their ability to explain the pattern of stock price predictability in the data. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark E. Wohar & David E. Rapach, 2005. "Valuation ratios and long-horizon stock price predictability," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 327-344.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:20:y:2005:i:3:p:327-344
    DOI: 10.1002/jae.774
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    File URL: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca:80/jae/2005-v20.3/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David McMillan & Alan Speight, 2006. "Non-linear long horizon returns predictability: evidence from six south-east Asian markets," Asia-Pacific Financial Markets, Springer;Japanese Association of Financial Economics and Engineering, vol. 13(2), pages 95-111, June.
    2. Lee, King Fuei, 2011. "Demographics and the Long-Horizon Returns of Dividend-Yield Strategies in the US," MPRA Paper 46350, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Thomas Q. Pedersen, 2015. "Predictable Return Distributions," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 34(2), pages 114-132, March.
    4. McMillan, David G., 2009. "Revisiting dividend yield dynamics and returns predictability: Evidence from a time-varying ESTR model," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 870-883, August.
    5. McMillan, David G., 2013. "Consumption and stock prices: Evidence from a small international panel," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 76-88.
    6. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Narayan, Seema & Sharma, Susan Sunila, 2013. "An analysis of commodity markets: What gain for investors?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3878-3889.
    7. Maynard, Alex & Ren, Dongmeng, 2019. "The finite sample power of long-horizon predictive tests in models with financial bubbles," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 418-430.
    8. Tseng, Chih-Hsiung & Cheng, Sheng-Tzong & Wang, Yi-Hsien & Peng, Jin-Tang, 2008. "Artificial neural network model of the hybrid EGARCH volatility of the Taiwan stock index option prices," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 387(13), pages 3192-3200.
    9. Algaba, Andres & Boudt, Kris, 2017. "Generalized financial ratios to predict the equity premium," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 244-257.
    10. Goodness C. Aye Author-Email: goodness.aye@gmail.com & Rangan Gupta, 2016. "Does Debt Ceiling and Government Shutdown Help in Forecasting the US Equity Risk Premium?," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 63(3), pages 273-291, June.
    11. Ralf Becker & Junsoo Lee & Benton Gup, 2012. "An empirical analysis of mean reversion of the S&P 500’s P/E ratios," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 36(3), pages 675-690, July.
    12. Huong Dang & Michael Jolly, 2016. "IPOs in New Zealand: Valuation Multiples and Benchmark Adjusted Performance," Working Papers in Economics 16/32, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    13. Hjalmarsson, Erik, 2012. "Some curious power properties of long-horizon tests," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 81-91.
    14. Lee, King Fuei, 2013. "Demographics and the long-horizon returns of dividend-yield strategies," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 202-218.
    15. Nikolaos Mitinanoudis & Theologos Dergiades, 2017. "Stock Prices Predictability at Long-horizons: Two Tales from the Time-Frequency Domain," Credit and Capital Markets, Credit and Capital Markets, vol. 50(1), pages 37-61.
    16. Shih, Kuang Hsun & Cheng, Ching Chan & Wang, Yi Hsien, 2011. "Financial Information Fraud Risk Warning for Manufacturing Industry - Using Logistic Regression and Neural Network," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 54-71, March.
    17. Ivan Contreras & J. Ignacio Hidalgo & Laura Nuñez, 2018. "Exploring the influence of industries and randomness in stock prices," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 713-729, September.
    18. Erik Hjalmarsson, 2006. "Inference in Long-Horizon Regressions," International Finance Discussion Papers 853, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 2006.
    19. David G. McMillan & Mark E. Wohar, 2010. "Stock return predictability and dividend-price ratio: a nonlinear approach," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 351-365.
    20. Nan-Kuang Chen & Han-Liang Cheng, 2017. "House price to income ratio and fundamentals: Evidence on long-horizon forecastability," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 293-311, August.
    21. McMillan, David G., 2007. "Bubbles in the dividend-price ratio? Evidence from an asymmetric exponential smooth-transition model," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 787-804, March.
    22. Snaith, Stuart & Coakley, Jerry & Kellard, Neil, 2013. "Does the forward premium puzzle disappear over the horizon?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3681-3693.

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