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Progressivity of personal income tax in Croatia: decomposition of tax base and rate effects

Author

Listed:
  • Ivica Urban

    (Institute of Public Finance, Zagreb)

Abstract

This paper presents progressivity breakdowns for Croatian personal income tax in 1997 and 2004. The decompositions reveal how the elements of the system – tax schedule, allowances, deductions and credits – contribute to the achievement of progressivity, over the quantiles of pre-tax income distribution. Through the use of ‘single parameter’ Gini indices, the social decision maker’s relatively more or less favorable inclination toward taxpayers in the lower tails of pre-tax income distribution is accounted for. Simulations are undertaken to show how the introduction of a flat-rate system would affect progressivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivica Urban, 2006. "Progressivity of personal income tax in Croatia: decomposition of tax base and rate effects," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 30(3), pages 207-231.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipf:finteo:v:30:y:2006:i:3:p:207-231
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    File URL: http://www.ijf.hr/eng/FTP/2006/3/urban.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mitja Cok & Ivica Urban, 2007. "Distribution of Income and Taxes in Slovenia and Croatia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 299-316.
    2. Anderson, John E. & Roy, Atrayee Ghosh & Shoemaker, Paul A., 2003. "Confidence Intervals for the Suits Index," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 56(1), pages 81-90, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ivica Urban, 2008. "Income Redistribution in Croatia: The Role of Individual Taxes and Social Transfers," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 32(3), pages 387-403.
    2. Ivica Urban, 2009. "Kakwani decomposition of redistributive effect: Origins, critics and upgrades," Working Papers 148, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    3. Fernando Di Nicola & Giorgio Mongelli & Simone Pellegrino, 2015. "The static microsimulation model of the Italian Department of Finance: Structure and first results regarding income and housing taxation," ECONOMIA PUBBLICA, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(2), pages 125-157.
    4. Ana Grdoviæ Gnip & Iva Tomic, 2010. "How hard does the tax bite hurt? Croatian vs. European worker," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 34(2), pages 109-142.
    5. Jorge Onrubia & Fidel Picos-Sánchez & María Carmen Rodado, 2014. "Rethinking the Pfähler–Lambert decomposition to analyse real-world personal income taxes," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 21(4), pages 796-812, August.
    6. Lina Zadorozhnia, 2016. "Comparative analysis of tax bases of personal income tax in the EU and Ukraine," Ukrainian Journal Ekonomist, Yuriy Kovalenko, issue 11, pages 26-32, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    personal income tax; progressivity; decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies

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