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Is Regime Switching in Stock Returns Important in Portfolio Decisions?

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  • Jun Tu

    () (Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University, Singapore 178899)

Abstract

The stock market displays regime switching between upturns and downturns. This paper provides a Bayesian framework for making portfolio decisions that takes this regime switching into account, together with asset pricing model uncertainty and parameter uncertainty. The findings reveal that the economic value of accounting for regimes is substantially independent of whether or not model and parameter uncertainties are incorporated: the certainty-equivalent losses associated with ignoring regime switching are generally above 2% per year and can be as high as 10%. These results suggest that the more realistic regime switching model is fundamentally different from the commonly used single-state model, and hence should be employed instead in portfolio decisions irrespective of concerns about model or parameter uncertainty.

Suggested Citation

  • Jun Tu, 2010. "Is Regime Switching in Stock Returns Important in Portfolio Decisions?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 56(7), pages 1198-1215, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:56:y:2010:i:7:p:1198-1215
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1100.1181
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Guidolin, Massimo & Liu, Hening, 2016. "Ambiguity Aversion and Underdiversification," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(04), pages 1297-1323, August.
    2. Konermann, Patrick & Meinerding, Christoph & Sedova, Olga, 2013. "Asset allocation in markets with contagion: The interplay between volatilities, jump intensities, and correlations," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 36-46.
    3. He, Zhongzhi (Lawrence) & Zhu, Jie & Zhu, Xiaoneng, 2015. "Multi-factor volatility and stock returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(S2), pages 132-149.
    4. Andrew Ang & Allan Timmermann, 2012. "Regime Changes and Financial Markets," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 313-337, October.
    5. Turtle, H.J. & Zhang, Chengping, 2012. "Time-varying performance of international mutual funds," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 334-348.
    6. Chevallier Julien & Goutte Stéphane, 2017. "On the estimation of regime-switching Lévy models," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 21(1), pages 3-29, February.
    7. Yoldas Emre, 2012. "Threshold Asymmetries in Equity Return Distributions: Statistical Tests and Investment Implications," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(5), pages 1-37, December.
    8. Levy, Moshe & Kaplanski, Guy, 2015. "Portfolio selection in a two-regime world," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 242(2), pages 514-524.
    9. Tu, Jun & Zhou, Guofu, 2010. "Incorporating Economic Objectives into Bayesian Priors: Portfolio Choice under Parameter Uncertainty," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(04), pages 959-986, August.
    10. Zhu, Xiaoneng & Zhu, Jie, 2013. "Predicting stock returns: A regime-switching combination approach and economic links," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4120-4133.
    11. Xavier Warin, 2016. "The Asset Liability Management problem of a nuclear operator : a numerical stochastic optimization approach," Papers 1611.04877, arXiv.org.
    12. Rapach, David & Zhou, Guofu, 2013. "Forecasting Stock Returns," Handbook of Economic Forecasting, Elsevier.
    13. Nyberg, Henri, 2013. "Predicting bear and bull stock markets with dynamic binary time series models," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3351-3363.
    14. Alexis Flageollet & Hamza Bahaji, 2016. "Monetary Policy and Risk-Based Asset Allocation," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 27(5), pages 851-870, November.
    15. Jing Wang & Xiaoneng Zhu, 2013. "The reaction of international stock markets to Federal Reserve policy," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 27(1), pages 1-30, March.
    16. Timotheos Angelidis & Nikolaos Tessaromatis, 2014. "Global portfolio management under state dependent multiple risk premia," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 0400966, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    17. Pedro Correia S. Bezerra & Pedro Henrique M. Albuquerque, 2017. "Volatility forecasting via SVR–GARCH with mixture of Gaussian kernels," Computational Management Science, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 179-196, April.
    18. repec:pal:assmgt:v:17:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1057_jam.2016.1 is not listed on IDEAS

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