IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/inm/ormksc/v24y2005i1p67-80.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Strategic Pricing and Detailing Behavior in International Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Pradeep K. Chintagunta

    () (Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637)

  • Ramarao Desiraju

    () (Department of Marketing, College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816)

Abstract

We study three determinants of the levels of price and detailing effort across geographic markets: the within-market response to each variable, the nature of interfirm strategic interactions both within that market and across markets. We empirically examine the interactions of Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil across the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Italy. Our results indicate that all three factors driving marketing mix interactions are at play in this product category. The U.S. market is less price-sensitive than the European markets. Detailing elasticities are comparable across the United States, Germany, and Italy, while the United Kingdom and France show greater elasticity. For the U.S. market, we find that almost all deviations from Nash pricing and detailing levels are due to within-market interactions. In the U.K. market, deviations from Nash prices come about due mostly to across-market interactions—both with the United States as well as the rest of Europe, whereas deviations from Nash detailing levels are mainly due to across-market interactions with the United States. For Italy, we observe that both within and across-market interactions affect price and detailing levels. Overall, the pattern of interactions makes observed prices more similar across countries than prices implied by the estimated elasticities. This underscores the importance of considering within- and across-market interactions in developing multimarket strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Pradeep K. Chintagunta & Ramarao Desiraju, 2005. "Strategic Pricing and Detailing Behavior in International Markets," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 24(1), pages 67-80, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormksc:v:24:y:2005:i:1:p:67-80
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.1030.0029
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hurwitz, Mark A & Caves, Richard E, 1988. "Persuasion or Information? Promotion and the Shares of Brand Name and Generic Pharmaceuticals," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(2), pages 299-320, October.
    2. Nevo, Aviv, 2001. "Measuring Market Power in the Ready-to-Eat Cereal Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(2), pages 307-342, March.
    3. Luis M. B. Cabral, 2001. "Multiproduct Oligopoly and Bertrand Supertraps," Working Papers 01-04, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    4. Danzon, Patricia M. & Chao, Li-Wei, 2000. "Cross-national price differences for pharmaceuticals: how large, and why?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 159-195, March.
    5. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
    6. Steven T. Berry, 1994. "Estimating Discrete-Choice Models of Product Differentiation," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 25(2), pages 242-262, Summer.
    7. Ramarao Desiraju & Sridhar Moorthy, 1997. "Managing a Distribution Channel Under Asymmetric Information with Performance Requirements," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(12), pages 1628-1644, December.
    8. Philip M. Parker & Lars-Hendrik Roller, 1997. "Collusive Conduct in Duopolies: Multimarket Contact and Cross-Ownership in the Mobile Telephone Industry," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(2), pages 304-322, Summer.
    9. John U. Farley & Donald R. Lehmann & Michael J. Ryan, 1982. "Patterns in Parameters of Buyer Behavior Models: Generalizing from Sparse Replication," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 1(2), pages 181-204.
    10. Berry, Steven & Levinsohn, James & Pakes, Ariel, 1995. "Automobile Prices in Market Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(4), pages 841-890, July.
    11. B. Douglas Bernheim & Michael D. Whinston, 1990. "Multimarket Contact and Collusive Behavior," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 21(1), pages 1-26, Spring.
    12. Rizzo, John A, 1999. "Advertising and Competition in the Ethical Pharmaceutical Industry: The Case of Antihypertensive Drugs," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(1), pages 89-116, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ludwig, Jens & Marcotte, Dave E. & Norberg, Karen, 2009. "Anti-depressants and suicide," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 659-676, May.
    2. Puneet Manchanda & Dick Wittink & Andrew Ching & Paris Cleanthous & Min Ding & Xiaojing Dong & Peter Leeflang & Sanjog Misra & Natalie Mizik & Sridhar Narayanan & Thomas Steenburgh & Jaap Wieringa & M, 2005. "Understanding Firm, Physician and Consumer Choice Behavior in the Pharmaceutical Industry," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 293-308, December.
    3. Ernst R. Berndt & Patricia M. Danzon & Gregory B. Kruse, 2007. "Dynamic competition in pharmaceuticals: cross-national evidence from new drug diffusion," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(4-5), pages 231-250.
    4. Dan Horsky & Sanjog Misra & Paul Nelson, 2006. "Observed and Unobserved Preference Heterogeneity in Brand-Choice Models," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 25(4), pages 322-335, 07-08.
    5. Justine S. Hastings & Ali Hortaçsu & Chad Syverson, 2013. "Sales Force and Competition in Financial Product Markets: The Case Of Mexico’s Social Security Privatization," NBER Working Papers 18881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Steven M. Shugan, 2007. "—It's the Findings, Stupid, Not the Assumptions," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 26(4), pages 449-459, 07-08.
    7. Sriram Venkataraman & Stefan Stremersch, 2007. "The Debate on Influencing Doctors' Decisions: Are Drug Characteristics the Missing Link?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 53(11), pages 1688-1701, November.
    8. Xueming Luo, 2009. "Quantifying the Long-Term Impact of Negative Word of Mouth on Cash Flows and Stock Prices," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 28(1), pages 148-165, 01-02.
    9. Wilfred Amaldoss & Chuan He, 2009. "Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs: A Strategic Analysis," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 28(3), pages 472-487, 05-06.
    10. Desiraju, Ramarao & Nair, Harikesh S. & Chintagunta, Pradeep, 2004. "Diffusion of New Pharmaceutical Drugs in Developing and Developed Nations," Research Papers 1950, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    11. Stefan Stremersch & Aurélie Lemmens, 2009. "Sales Growth of New Pharmaceuticals Across the Globe: The Role of Regulatory Regimes," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 28(4), pages 690-708, 07-08.
    12. Stremersch, S. & Lemmens, A., 2008. "Sales Growth of New Pharmaceuticals Across the Globe: The Role of Regulatory Regimes," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2008-026-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:inm:ormksc:v:24:y:2005:i:1:p:67-80. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mirko Janc). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/inforea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.