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Import Prices and Inflation

Author

Listed:
  • James D. Hamilton

    (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract

Understanding the consequences of international developments for domestic inflation is an extremely important question for central banks. But before we claim to have measured the extent of import price pass-through, it is necessary to be clear on exactly what such a number is intended to mean. One can attempt to come up with an answer on the basis of either economic theory or empirical evidence. There are important pitfalls associated with either approach and significant benefits from combining the two.

Suggested Citation

  • James D. Hamilton, 2012. "Import Prices and Inflation," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(1), pages 271-279, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijc:ijcjou:y:2012:q:1:a:13
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lutz Kilian, 2009. "Not All Oil Price Shocks Are Alike: Disentangling Demand and Supply Shocks in the Crude Oil Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 1053-1069, June.
    2. Lutz Kilian & Robert J. Vigfusson, 2011. "Are the responses of the U.S. economy asymmetric in energy price increases and decreases?," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 2(3), pages 419-453, November.
    3. Lutz Kilian & Bruce Hicks, 2013. "Did Unexpectedly Strong Economic Growth Cause the Oil Price Shock of 2003–2008?," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(5), pages 385-394, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christiane Baumeister & Lutz Kilian, 2014. "Do oil price increases cause higher food prices?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 29(80), pages 691-747, October.
    2. Leandro Medina, 2016. "The Effects of Commodity Price Shocks on Fiscal Aggregates in Latin America," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(3), pages 502-525, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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