IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ijb/journl/v9y2010i3p179-200.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Firm Maturity and the Pecking Order Theory

Author

Listed:
  • Laarni Bulan

    (International Business School, Brandeis University, U.S.A.)

  • Zhipeng Yan

    (School of Management, New Jersey Institute of Technology, U.S.A.)

Abstract

We identify firms according to two life cycle stages, namely growth and maturity, and test the pecking order theory of financing. We find a strong maturity effect, i.e., the pecking order theory describes the financing behavior of mature firms better than growth firms. Our findings show that firm maturity is an alternative proxy for debt capacity. In particular, mature firms are older, more stable, and highly profitable with good credit histories. Thus, they naturally have greater debt capacity. After controlling for firm maturity, the pecking order theory describes the financing behavior of firms fairly well.

Suggested Citation

  • Laarni Bulan & Zhipeng Yan, 2010. "Firm Maturity and the Pecking Order Theory," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 9(3), pages 179-200, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijb:journl:v:9:y:2010:i:3:p:179-200
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ijbe.org/table%20of%20content/pdf/vol9-3/vol9-3-01.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.ijbe.org/table%20of%20content/abstract/Vol.9/No.3/01.htm
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stewart C. Myers & Nicholas S. Majluf, 1984. "Corporate Financing and Investment Decisions When Firms Have InformationThat Investors Do Not Have," NBER Working Papers 1396, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicholas S., 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 187-221, June.
    3. Lemmon, Michael L. & Zender, Jaime F., 2010. "Debt Capacity and Tests of Capital Structure Theories," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(05), pages 1161-1187, October.
    4. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 2005. "Financing decisions: who issues stock?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 549-582, June.
    5. Edward I. Altman, 1968. "Financial Ratios, Discriminant Analysis And The Prediction Of Corporate Bankruptcy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 23(4), pages 589-609, September.
    6. Frank, Murray Z. & Goyal, Vidhan K., 2003. "Testing the pecking order theory of capital structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 217-248, February.
    7. Chirinko, Robert S. & Singha, Anuja R., 2000. "Testing static tradeoff against pecking order models of capital structure: a critical comment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 417-425, December.
    8. Diamond, Douglas W, 1991. "Monitoring and Reputation: The Choice between Bank Loans and Directly Placed Debt," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 689-721, August.
    9. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicolás S., 1945-, 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Working papers 1523-84., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    10. Lang, Larry H P & Stulz, Rene M, 1994. "Tobin's q, Corporate Diversification, and Firm Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1248-1280, December.
    11. Diamond, Douglas W, 1989. "Reputation Acquisition in Debt Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 828-862, August.
    12. Viswanath, P. V., 1993. "Strategic Considerations, the Pecking Order Hypothesis, and Market Reactions to Equity Financing," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(02), pages 213-234, June.
    13. DeAngelo, Harry & DeAngelo, Linda & Stulz, Rene M., 2006. "Dividend policy and the earned/contributed capital mix: a test of the life-cycle theory," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 227-254, August.
    14. Anthony, Joseph H. & Ramesh, K., 1992. "Association between accounting performance measures and stock prices : A test of the life cycle hypothesis," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2-3), pages 203-227, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bruce Dwyer & Bernice Kotey, 2015. "Financing SME Growth: The Role of the National Stock Exchange of Australia and Business Advisors," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 25(2), pages 114-123, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    life cycle; pecking order; capital structure;

    JEL classification:

    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ijb:journl:v:9:y:2010:i:3:p:179-200. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Yi-Ju Su). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cbfcutw.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.