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Government spending on research and development in the UK


  • Paul Stoneman


This paper explores the extent of current UK government spending on science and technology placed in its recent historical context. The allocation of this spending across the different arms of government, the primary purposes of the expenditures undertaken and the extent to which the government performs as well as funds R&D are also explored, with some international comparisons analysed. The political and institutional processes that determine the revealed patterns of expenditure in the UK, the rationales behind such spending and the aims and objectives of the main spending departments are discussed, as is the interaction with EU expenditures on science and technology. The effectiveness of or pay-off to government support of this kind is also considered before future spending plans are addressed.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Stoneman, 1999. "Government spending on research and development in the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 20(3), pages 223-259, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:20:y:1999:i:3:p:223-259

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tor Jakob Klette & Jarle Møen & Zvi Griliches, 1999. "Do Subsidies to Commercial R&D Reduce Market Failures? Microeconomic Evaluation Studies," NBER Working Papers 6947, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dasgupta, Partha & David, Paul, 1985. "Information Disclosure and the Economics of Science and Technology," CEPR Discussion Papers 73, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shaw, Sara E. & Greenhalgh, Trisha, 2008. "Best research - For what? Best health - For whom? A critical exploration of primary care research using discourse analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(12), pages 2506-2519, June.
    2. David, Paul A. & Hall, Bronwyn H. & Toole, Andrew A., 2000. "Is public R&D a complement or substitute for private R&D? A review of the econometric evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4-5), pages 497-529, April.
    3. Goodridge, PR & Haskel, J & Wallis, G, 2014. "The “C†in ICT: communications capital, spillovers and UK growth," Working Papers 18382, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.

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    JEL classification:

    • H - Public Economics
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth


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