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The dynamics of male retirement behaviour

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  • Sarah Tanner

Abstract

This paper uses data from the two waves of the UK Retirement Survey to present a detailed descriptive analysis of the retirement behaviour of older men. The main motivation for doing this is the fall in the employment rates of older men over the last 20 years. A comparison of the labour market behaviour of men with and without an occupational pension suggests that increases in the coverage and levels of occupational pensions may not be enough to explain the long-term trends in labour market behaviour, but that there are important differences in the retirement experiences of the two groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Tanner, 1998. "The dynamics of male retirement behaviour," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(2), pages 175-196, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:19:y:1998:i:2:p:175-196
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/fs/articles/tanner_may98.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Meghir, Costas & Whitehouse, Edward, 1997. "Labour market transitions and retirement of men in the UK," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 327-354, August.
    2. Richard Disney & Costas Meghir & Edward Whitehouse, 1994. "Retirement behaviour in Britain," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(1), pages 24-43, February.
    3. Richard Disney, 1996. "Can We Afford to Grow Older?," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026204157x, January.
    4. Blau, David M, 1994. "Labor Force Dynamics of Older Men," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(1), pages 117-156, January.
    5. Dilnot, Andrew & Disney, Richard & Johnson, Paul & Whitehouse, Edward, 1994. "Pensions policy in the UK: An economic analysis," MPRA Paper 10478, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Whitehouse, Edward, 2000. "Pension reform, financial literacy and public information: a case study of the United Kingdom," MPRA Paper 10323, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. James Banks & Carl Emmerson, 2000. "Public and private pension spending: principles, practice and the need for reform," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 1-63, March.
    3. Bardasi, Elena & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Rigg, John A., 2000. "Retirement and the economic well-being of the elderly: a British perspective," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-33, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Banks, James & Rohwedder, Susann, 2001. "Life-cycle saving patterns and pension arrangements in the U.K," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 83-107, March.
    5. David Dorn & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2010. "'Voluntary' and 'involuntary' early retirement: an international analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 427-438.
    6. Campbell, Nigel, 1999. "The decline of employment among older people in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6501, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Frank T. Denton & Ross Finnie & Byron G. Spencer, 2009. "Patterns of Retirement as Reflected in Income Tax Records for Older Workers," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 434, McMaster University.
    8. Richard Disney & Tanner, Tanner, 1999. "What can we learn from retirement expectations data?," IFS Working Papers W99/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Federico Biagi & ?Danilo Cavapozzi & ?Raffaele Miniaci, 2007. "Technology, Skills and Retirement," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0042, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    10. María José Luengo-Prado & Almudena Sevilla-Sanz, 2010. "Consumption, retirement and life-cycle prices: Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 2010-18, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
    11. Frank T. Denton & Byron G. Spencer, 2008. "What is Retirement? A Review and Assessment of Alternative Concepts and Measures," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 231, McMaster University.
    12. Disney, Richard & Emmerson, Carl & Wakefield, Matthew, 2006. "Ill health and retirement in Britain: A panel data-based analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 621-649, July.
    13. Nigel Campbell, 1999. "The Decline of Employment Among Older People in Britain," CASE Papers 019, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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