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Retirement and the economic well-being of the elderly: a British perspective

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  • Bardasi, Elena
  • Jenkins, Stephen P.
  • Rigg, John A.

Abstract

Little is known about the income dynamics and retirement in Britain, in part because of a lack of data. The information is of some topical interest given the growing number of elderly people, the trend towards earlier retirement, the decline in the value of the basic state pension and the growing reliance on occupational and private pensions, and continuing relatively high poverty rates among the elderly. This paper considers the important question of income and retirement and, in particular, the association between transitions into retirement and the probability of becoming poor. It is based on longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey waves 1-7, covering 1991-1997. We also aim to relate differences in poverty entry probabilities among the retired to differences in factors such as a retiree's health, housing tenure, age and sex, education, labour market status and history (and hence routes into retirement) household composition and spouse's characteristics

Suggested Citation

  • Bardasi, Elena & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Rigg, John A., 2000. "Retirement and the economic well-being of the elderly: a British perspective," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-33, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2000-33
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2000-33.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joseph Quinn, "undated". "New Paths to Retirement," Pension Research Council Working Papers 98-10, Wharton School Pension Research Council, University of Pennsylvania.
    2. Sarah Tanner, 1998. "The dynamics of male retirement behaviour," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(2), pages 175-196, May.
    3. Paul Johnson & Gary Stears & Steven Webb, 1998. "The dynamics of incomes and occupational pensions after retirement," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(2), pages 197-215, May.
    4. Johnson, Paul & Stears, Gary, 1998. "Why Are Older Pensioners Poorer?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(3), pages 271-290, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aaron George Grech, 2013. "How best to measure pension adequacy," CASE Papers case172, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    2. Marjan, MAES, 2008. "Poverty persistence among Belgian elderly in the transition from work to retirement : an empirical analysis," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2008042, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    3. Joachim R. Frick & Markus M. Grabka, 2002. "The Personal Distribution of Income and Imputed Rent: A Cross-National Comparison for the UK, West Germany and the USA," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 271, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Demirguc-Kunt,Asli & Klapper,Leora & Panos,Georgios A., 2016. "Saving for old age," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7693, The World Bank.
    5. Marjan Maes, 2013. "Poverty persistence among the elderly in the transition from work to retirement," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(1), pages 35-56, March.
    6. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2009. "Spaghetti unravelled: a model-based description of differences in income-age trajectories," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-30, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Maes, Marjan, 2008. "Poverty persistence among Belgian elderly: true or spurious?," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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