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The distribution of UK household expenditure, 1979-92

Author

Listed:
  • Alissa Goodman

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Steven Webb

Abstract

The rapid growth in income inequality in the UK over the 1980s has excited a good deal of interest and concern. A primary reason for this concern has been the widely- drawn conclusion that the living standards of the very poorest have at best failed to keep pace with the living standards of the rest of society. This report sheds new light on the living standards debate, by considering how household expenditure has changed over the period 1979-92. Examination of the expenditure of households appearing in the Family Expenditure Surveys of 1979-92 reveals some rather different trends from the well-documented changes in household incomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Alissa Goodman & Steven Webb, 1995. "The distribution of UK household expenditure, 1979-92," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 16(3), pages 55-80, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:16:y:1995:i:3:p:55-80
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/fs/articles/fsgoodman.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Banks, James & Blundell, Richard & Tanner, Sarah, 1998. "Is There a Retirement-Savings Puzzle?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(4), pages 769-788, September.
    2. Richard Blundell & Ian Preston, 1995. "Income, expenditure and the living standards of UK households," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 16(3), pages 40-54, August.
    3. Blundell, Richard & Pashardes, Panos & Weber, Guglielmo, 1993. "What Do We Learn About Consumer Demand Patterns from Micro Data?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 570-597, June.
    4. Paul Baker, 1993. "Taxpayer compliance of the self-employed: estimates from household spending data," IFS Working Papers W93/14, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    1. repec:bla:jorssa:v:180:y:2017:i:2:p:455-474 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:sus:susedp:9316 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ian Gazeley & Hector Gutierrez Rufrancos & Andrew Newell & Kevin Reynolds & Rebecca Searle, 2016. "The Poor and the Poorest, fifty years on: Evidence from British Household Expenditure Surveys of the 1950s and 1960s," Working Paper Series 09316, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    4. Ian Gazeley & Hector Gutierrez Rufrancos & Andrew Newell & Kevin Reynolds & Rebecca Searle, 2016. "The Poor and the Poorest, fifty years on: Evidence from British Household Expenditure Surveys of the 1950s and 1960s," Working Paper Series 9316, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.

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