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Residual Wage Disparity And Coordination Unemployment

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  • Benoit Julien
  • John Kennes
  • Ian King

Abstract

How much of residual wage dispersion can be explained by an absence of coordination among firms? To answer, we construct a dynamic directed search model with identical workers where firms can create high- or low-productivity jobs and are uncoordinated in their offers to workers, calibrated to the U.S. economy. Workers can exploit ex post opportunities once approached by firms, and can conduct on-the-job search. The stationary equilibrium wage distribution is hump-shaped, skewed significantly to the right, and, with baseline parameters, generates residual dispersion statistics 75-90% of those found empirically. However, the model underestimates the average duration of unemployment. Copyright 2006 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Benoit Julien & John Kennes & Ian King, 2006. "Residual Wage Disparity And Coordination Unemployment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 961-989, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:47:y:2006:i:3:p:961-989
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    Cited by:

    1. Aaron Schiff & Martin Browning & John Kennes, 2005. "Lots of Heterogeneity in a Matching Model," 2005 Meeting Papers 799, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Basov, Suren & King, Ian & Uren, Lawrence, 2014. "Worker heterogeneity, the job-finding rate, and technical change," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 159-177.
    3. John Kennes & Daniel le Maire, 2013. "Job Heterogeneity and Coordination Frictions," Economics Working Papers 2013-09, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    4. John Kennes & Daniel le Maire, 2013. "Competing Auctions of Skills," CAM Working Papers 2014_01, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
    5. Derek Stacey, 2012. "Information, Commitment, and Separation in Illiquid Housing Markets," 2012 Meeting Papers 401, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Wolthoff, Ronald P., 2011. "It's About Time: Implications of the Period Length in an Equilibrium Job Search Model," IZA Discussion Papers 6002, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. BenoƮt Julien & John Kennes & Ian King & Sephorah Mangin, 2009. "Directed search, unemployment and public policy," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 956-983, August.
    8. Kaas Leo, 2010. "Variable Search Intensity with Coordination Unemployment," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-33, October.
    9. Ronald Wolthoff, 2009. "Ex Ante and Ex Post Inefficiency in Search and Matching Models," 2009 Meeting Papers 774, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. John Kennes & Daniel le Maire, 2010. "Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity: A Discrete Time Analysis," Economics Working Papers 2010-05, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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