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Impact of Budget Deficit on Private Consumption inWAEMU Countries: Evidence from Pooled Mean Group Estimation

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  • Yaya Keho

Abstract

This study empirically investigates the impact of budget deficit on private consumption in seven member countries of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU), namely Benin, Burkina Faso, C?te d¡¯Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Senegal and Togo. It applies the pooled mean group estimation method to annual data covering the period 1970 to 2013. The results show that budget deficit and per capita GDP have long run positive effects on household consumption whereas inflation rate is detrimental to private consumption. This suggests that private consumption cannot be held responsible for any crowding-out effects that budget deficit might have on long run aggregate demand and economic growth in WAEMU countries. Therefore, restricting the size of budget deficits is costly for the development of WAEMU countries.

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  • Yaya Keho, 2016. "Impact of Budget Deficit on Private Consumption inWAEMU Countries: Evidence from Pooled Mean Group Estimation," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 8(3), pages 189-195, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibn:ijefaa:v:8:y:2016:i:3:p:189-195
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    broad money supply M2; Consumer Price Index (CPI) and Consumer Price Index of Main Partners (WACPI); Government expenditure (GEXP); Nominal Effective Exchange Rate (NEER); and Nominal Interest Rate (NIR);
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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