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Analysis of the Population Assistance and Returning Home in the Reconstruction Process of the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake

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Listed:
  • Antonio Mannella

    (Italian National Research Council, Construction Technologies Institute (ITC), Via Giosuè Carducci 32, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy)

  • Marco Di Ludovico

    (Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy)

  • Antonio Sabino

    (Italian National Research Council, Construction Technologies Institute (ITC), Via Giosuè Carducci 32, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy)

  • Andrea Prota

    (Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy)

  • Mauro Dolce

    (Presidency of Council of Ministers—Civil Protection Department, 00193 Rome, Italy)

  • Gaetano Manfredi

    (Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy)

Abstract

The 2009 L’Aquila earthquake left approximately 67,000 homeless people. The earthquake severely damaged facilities, structures, and infrastructure of L’Aquila town, the capital of Abruzzo region, as well as 56 other municipalities in the so-called “crater”. The resident population in the crater area at the time of the earthquake included 68,503 inhabitants in the city of L’Aquila and 71,081 in other municipalities of the crater, yielding a total of 139,584 inhabitants. Several solutions were adopted to host homeless people in the immediate emergency phase; then, temporary accommodations were built to host people up to the completion of the reconstruction process. This paper analyzes the timeline by which people who lived in L’Aquila city at the time of earthquake was enabled to return to their houses, either repaired and strengthened or rebuilt. In particular, this analysis covers the first phase of the reconstruction process as well as its second phase, which is currently still ongoing in L’Aquila’s historical centers. The trend of a population returning home discussed herein has been determined based on data collected from different databases given by several institutions engaged in the emergency and reconstruction phases; this allowed an estimation of the number of people returned to their homes over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio Mannella & Marco Di Ludovico & Antonio Sabino & Andrea Prota & Mauro Dolce & Gaetano Manfredi, 2017. "Analysis of the Population Assistance and Returning Home in the Reconstruction Process of the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(8), pages 1-20, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:8:p:1395-:d:107472
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jasmin Gröschl & Thomas Steinwachs, 2017. "Do Natural Hazards Cause International Migration?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 445-480.
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