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Positioning and Priorities of Growth Management in Construction Industrialization: Chinese Firm-Level Empirical Research

Author

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  • Jingxiao Zhang

    () (School of Economics and Management, Chang’an University, Middle-section of Nan’er Huan Road, Xi’an 710064, China)

  • Haiyan Xie

    () (Department of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology, Illinois State University, Turner 5100, Normal, IL 61790, USA)

  • Hui Li

    () (School of Civil Engineering, Chang’an University, No. 161, Chang’an Road, Xi’an 710061, China)

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to quantitatively evaluate the growth phase, position, and priorities of the industrialization policy management of the construction industry at firm level. The goal is to integrate quantitative dynamics into the policy-making process for sustainable policy development in future China. This research proposes an integrated framework, including growth management model and industrial policy evaluation method, to identify the challenges of construction industrialization and policy management. The research applies the mixed system method, which includes entropy method and average score method, to analyze the growth stage and major impact indexes targeting 327 survey samples. The empirical results show that the proposed conceptual framework and policy evaluation method could effectively determine the growth position and directions of the construction industrialization. For verification purpose, the study uses the local industry data from Shaanxi Province, China. The calculation results substantiate that the construction industry is in the middle section of the third growth phase. The comparison of the results from statistical methods shows that the local construction industry still needs substantial effort in policy management to improve its sustainable industrialization level. As countermeasures, the policy priorities should concentrate on: (1) enhancing effective cooperation among universities, research institutions and enterprises; (2) improving actions towards technology transfer into productivity; and (3) encouraging market acceptance of construction industrialization. This research complements the existing literature of policy evaluation of construction industrialization. Moreover, it provides theoretical and operational steps on industry policy evaluation and growth management framework, with accurate and ample data analysis on firm-level survey. Researchers and policy makers can use this research for further extensions of policy management for construction industrialization.

Suggested Citation

  • Jingxiao Zhang & Haiyan Xie & Hui Li, 2017. "Positioning and Priorities of Growth Management in Construction Industrialization: Chinese Firm-Level Empirical Research," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(7), pages 1-23, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:1105-:d:102562
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yeongjun Yeo & Chansoo Park, 2018. "Managing Growing Pains for the Sustainable Growth of Organizations: Evidence from the Growth Pathways and Strategic Choices of Korean Firms," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-24, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sustainable position; construction industry; industrial policy assessment; growth management model; industrialization;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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