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Urban Land Expansion and Sustainable Land Use Policy in Shenzhen: A Case Study of China’s Rapid Urbanization

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Listed:
  • Jing Qian

    () (School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China
    Shenzhen Urban Planning and Land Resource Research Center, 8009 Hongli Road, Shenzhen 518040, China
    Key Laboratory of GIS, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China)

  • Yunfei Peng

    () (School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China
    Shenzhen Urban Planning and Land Resource Research Center, 8009 Hongli Road, Shenzhen 518040, China
    Key Laboratory of GIS, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China)

  • Cheng Luo

    () (College of Public Administration, Huazhong Agricultural University, 1 Shizishan Street, Wuhan 430070, China)

  • Chao Wu

    () (School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China
    Key Laboratory of GIS, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China)

  • Qingyun Du

    () (School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China
    Key Laboratory of GIS, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, 129 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079, China)

Abstract

Shenzhen is a city that is highly representative of China’s rapid urbanization process. As the city rapidly expands, there are enormous challenges to the sustainable use of land resources. This paper introduces the evolution of urban land expansion and the sustainable land use policy of the Shenzhen Government since 2005. The policy covers the reduction in rural-to-urban land conversion, the delineation of urban growth boundaries, arable land reclamation and the establishment of farmland protection areas, urban redevelopment, and the investigation and prosecution of illegal construction. This paper considers the aspects of urbanization and land management systems that are unique to China. The current top-down indicative and mandatory mode of control, which relies on the central government, has very limited effects. Good results were achieved in Shenzhen for the following elements: governmental self-restraint, governmental identity change, and policy innovation. Shenzhen’s sustainable land use practices can provide a reference for other cities in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Jing Qian & Yunfei Peng & Cheng Luo & Chao Wu & Qingyun Du, 2015. "Urban Land Expansion and Sustainable Land Use Policy in Shenzhen: A Case Study of China’s Rapid Urbanization," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-16, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2015:i:1:p:16-:d:61206
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Lu Zhang & Hongru Du & Yannan Zhao, 2016. "Game Behavior Analysis between the Local Government and Land-Lost Peasants in the Urbanization Process," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-15, November.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:8:p:2953-:d:164662 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    urban land expansion; urbanization; land use policy; sustainable development; Shenzhen; China;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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