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Investigating Dominant Trip Distance for Intercity Passenger Transport Mode Using Large-Scale Location-Based Service Data

Author

Listed:
  • Yun Xiang

    () (College of City Construction, Jiangxi Normal University, 99 Ziyang Avenue, Nanchang 330022, China)

  • Chengcheng Xu

    () (School of Transportation, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou, Nanjing 210096, China)

  • Weijie Yu

    () (School of Transportation, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou, Nanjing 210096, China)

  • Shuyi Wang

    () (Suning Financial Group, Suning Road, Nanjing 210000, China)

  • Xuedong Hua

    () (School of Transportation, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou, Nanjing 210096, China)

  • Wei Wang

    () (School of Transportation, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou, Nanjing 210096, China)

Abstract

Intercity transport systems have been plagued by low efficiency and overutilization for a long time, due to unhealthy competition among multi-transport modes. Hence, this study aims to estimate the dominant trip distance of intercity passenger transport modes to optimize the allocation of intercity passenger transport resources and improve the efficiency of intercity transport systems. Dominant trip distance was classified into two types: Absolute dominant trip distance and relative dominant trip distance; and their respective models were developed using passenger transport mode share functions and fitting curves. Particularly, the big data of intercity passenger transport mode share rate of more than 360 cities in China was obtained using a network crawler and each passenger transport mode share function and their curves were proposed. Furthermore, the dominant trip distances estimation models of intercity passenger transport were developed and solved. The results show that there are significant differences in dominant trip distance between the transport modes. For example, the absolute and relative dominant trip distances of highway are 8–119 km and 8–463 km, respectively, while those of airway are 1594–3000 km and 2477–3000 km, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Yun Xiang & Chengcheng Xu & Weijie Yu & Shuyi Wang & Xuedong Hua & Wei Wang, 2019. "Investigating Dominant Trip Distance for Intercity Passenger Transport Mode Using Large-Scale Location-Based Service Data," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(19), pages 1-17, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:19:p:5325-:d:271064
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    intercity passenger transport; passenger transport mode; mode share; dominant trip distance; large-scale location-based service data;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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