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Financial evolution and the long-run behavior of velocity : new evidence from U.S. regional data

  • Peter N. Ireland

Innovations in the private financial sector influence the income velocity of money in an economy over the entire course of its development. In the early stages of growth, increased monetization, as manifested by the spread of the banking system, causes velocity to fall. Later, the emergence of nonbank financial intermediaries causes velocity to rise. Evidence of these patterns is found in regional demand deposit data from the United States.

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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond in its journal Economic Review.

Volume (Year): (1991)
Issue (Month): Nov ()
Pages: 16-26

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrer:y:1991:i:nov:p:16-26:n:v.77no.6
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  1. Bordo, Michael D. & Jonung, Lars, 1990. "The long-run behavior of velocity: The institutional approach revisited," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 165-197.
  2. Raj, Baldev & Siklos, Pierre L, 1988. "Some Qualms about the Test of the Institutional Hypothesis of the Long-run Behavior of Velocity," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(3), pages 537-45, July.
  3. Lucas, Robert E., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 137-167, January.
  4. Rasche, Robert H., 1987. "M1 -- Velocity and money-demand functions: Do stable relationships exist?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 9-88, January.
  5. Jared Enzler & Lewis Johnson & John Paulus, 1976. "Some Problems of Money Demand," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(1), pages 261-282.
  6. Allan H. Meltzer, 1963. "The Demand for Money: The Evidence from the Time Series," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 71, pages 219.
  7. Milton Friedman, 1959. "The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67, pages 327.
  8. Courtenay C. Stone & Daniel L. Thornton, 1987. "Solving the 1980s' velocity puzzle: a progress report," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Aug, pages 5-23.
  9. King, Robert G., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 169-172, January.
  10. R. W. Hafer & Scott E. Hein, 1982. "The shift in money demand: what really happened?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Feb, pages 11-16.
  11. Hetzel, Robert L & Mehra, Yash P, 1989. "The Behavior of Money Demand in the 1980s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 455-63, November.
  12. Townsend, Robert M, 1987. "Economic Organization with Limited Communication," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 954-71, December.
  13. Raymond W. Goldsmith, 1958. "Financial Intermediaries in the American Economy Since 1900," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gold58-1, August.
  14. Goldfeld, Stephen M. & Sichel, Daniel E., 1990. "The demand for money," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 299-356 Elsevier.
  15. Hamilton, James D., 1989. "The long-run behavior of the velocity of circulation : A review essay," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 335-344, March.
  16. Raj, B. & Siklos, P.L., 1988. "Some Qualms About The Rest Of The Institutionalist Hypothesis Of The Long -Run Behavior Of Velocity," Working Papers 88121, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics.
  17. Stephen M. Goldfeld, 1976. "The Case of the Missing Money," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(3), pages 683-740.
  18. Bordo, Michael David & Jonung, Lars, 1981. "The Long Run Behavior of the Income Velocity of Money in Five Advanced Countries, 1870-1975: An Institutional Approach," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(1), pages 96-116, January.
  19. Darby, Michael R & Mascaro, Angelo R & Marlow, Michael L, 1989. "The Empirical Reliability of Monetary Aggregates as Indicators: 1983-1987," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(4), pages 555-85, October.
  20. Friedman, Milton & Schwartz, Anna J, 1991. "Alternative Approaches to Analyzing Economic Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 39-49, March.
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