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Case studies on disruptions during the crisis

Author

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  • Tanju Yorulmazer

Abstract

The 2007-09 financial crisis saw many funding mechanisms challenged by a drastic reduction in market liquidity, a sharp increase in the cost of transactions, and, in some cases, a drying-up in financing. This article presents case studies of several key financial markets and intermediaries under significant distress at this time. For each case, the author discusses the size and evolution of the funding mechanism, the sources of the disruptions, and the policy responses aimed at mitigating distress and making markets more liquid. The review serves as a reference on the vulnerabilities of funding structures and is useful for those considering the scope and design of reform efforts.

Suggested Citation

  • Tanju Yorulmazer, 2014. "Case studies on disruptions during the crisis," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Feb, pages 17-28.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:00006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Covitz & Nellie Liang & Gustavo A. Suarez, 2013. "The Evolution of a Financial Crisis: Collapse of the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(3), pages 815-848, June.
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    7. Olivier Armantier & Sandra C. Krieger & James J. McAndrews, 2008. "The Federal Reserve's Term Auction Facility," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Jul).
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    Cited by:

    1. Huberto Ennis & Todd Keister, 2016. "Optimal banking contracts and financial fragility," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 61(2), pages 335-363, February.
    2. Ryuichiro Izumi, 2021. "Opacity: Insurance and Fragility," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 40, pages 146-169, April.
    3. Bogataj, D. & Aver, B. & Bogataj, M., 2016. "Supply chain risk at simultaneous robust perturbations," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 181(PA), pages 68-78.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money market mutual funds; Commercial paper; Wholesale funding; Repo; Dollar swap lines; Asset-backed commercial paper;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other

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