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Lessons on the Economics of Pandemics from Recent Research

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Abstract

The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a dual public health and economic crisis. Many economic studies in the past few months have explored the relationship between the spread of disease and economic activity, the role for government intervention in the crisis, and the effectiveness of testing and containment policies. This Commentary summarizes the methods and findings of a number of these studies. The economic research conducted to date shows that adequate testing and selective containment measures can be effective in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, and in the absence of adequate testing capabilities, optimal interventions involve social distancing and other lockdown measures.

Suggested Citation

  • , 2020. "Lessons on the Economics of Pandemics from Recent Research," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, vol. 2020(11), pages 1-7, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcec:88077
    DOI: 10.26509/frbc-ec-202011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Greg Kaplan & Benjamin Moll & Giovanni L. Violante, 2018. "Monetary Policy According to HANK," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(3), pages 697-743, March.
    2. Callum J. Jones & Thomas Philippon & Venky Venkateswaran, 2020. "Optimal Mitigation Policies in a Pandemic: Social Distancing and Working from Home," NBER Working Papers 26984, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones & Peter J. Klenow, 2020. "Trading Off Consumption and COVID-19 Deaths," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, vol. 42(1), pages 1-14, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sewon Hur, 2020. "The Distributional Effects of COVID-19 and Optimal Mitigation Policies," Globalization Institute Working Papers 400, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 23 Oct 2020.
    2. Arazi, R. & Feigel, A., 2021. "Discontinuous transitions of social distancing in the SIR model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 566(C).
    3. Anand Chopra & Michael B. Devereux & Amartya Lahiri, 2020. "Pandemics Through the Lens of Occupations," NBER Working Papers 27841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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